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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

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PART* 



109 G St. N. W. - Washington, D. C. 

How to End 



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The Next War! 

In spite of disarmament conferences, peace pacts, international courts, 
and the League of Nations, people talk of " The Next War." 

The last war did not end war. Others more terrible are in the making. 
Huge sums of money are being spent by this and other nations for military 
purposes. There are today 1 0,000,000 more soldiers under arms than in 1 9 1 4 
and war equipment is five times as great. Every year three-fourths of our 
taxes pay for old wars and preparations for new ones. 

^S^ " N ^^ ^ ne next war wou ^ not be confined to armies 

alone. Men, women, and children would fall victims 
to the death-dealing explosives, gases, and disease 
germs hurled down on helpless cities from speeding 
planes far beyond the reach of defense guns. Neither 
age nor sex would be spared ; whole populations would 
be wiped out like rats in traps. 

"There are now at least two varieties of poison 
gas against which no mask is any protection," Stuart 
Chase tells us in an appalling survey. "There are also irritating gases which 
cause the sufferer to tear off his mask and take a good full breath of the poison 
gas which has previously been laid. Eight scourges are available for germ 
bombs: yellow fever, dysentery, diphtheria, malaria, typhus, plague, cholera, 
and typhoid fever." 

There is practically no limit to the power of death-dealing devices now 
at the service of warring nations. 

Since defense against these terrifically efficient 
weapons is almost impossible, there are just two possible 
courses open: Peace — or a return to barbarism. 

The germ of modern wars is IMPERIALISM. 
It is often called " dollar diplomacy." It comes into 
being in the most advanced industrial countries because 
a small number of persons through ownership of the 
big industries and exploitation of the workers get more 84.510.000.000 
money than they can put to immediate use. They look 
for fields for investment where the -.an get the greatest 




-amo-iot 

PROPERTY DESTROYED 
1914-DU 



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20 Years After 



1914 — 1934 



By JAMES LERNER 



Issued by 

YOUTH SECTION 

American League Against War and Fascism 



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SOCIAL ATTITUDES 
TOWARDS WAR 



. 


AND PEACE 




By 

AUGUST CLAESSENS 




Instructor, 

Rand School of Social Science 


. 


Introduction 

By 

George W. Hartmann 

Professor of Psychology 

Pennsylvania State College 




RAND SCHOOL PRESS 
7 East 15th St., New York 
1934 


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STUDENTS * 
FIGHT WAR 



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; Published by 

NATIONAL STUDENT LEAGUE 



Five Cents 



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CHRISTIANITY odbdw 

vs. 
ORGANIZED PACIFISM 



Fred R. Marvin 



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/LEAGUE FOR CONSTITUTIONAL GOVERNMENT 

18 East Forty-Eighth Street 

New York City 



Price, Ten Cents 



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Students 



asanas* Will* 




National 
Council of 
Methodist Youth 

and 

World Peace Commission 
General Conference, 

' odist Episcopal Church 

St., Chicago, Illinois 



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//ou; to Fight 

WAR 



Isolation ^^k 
Collective Security W 
Relentless Class Struggle 



JAMES BURNHAM 



ScejsUist Workers Part/ 

East Side Branch / 
78 St Marks Pkyf 

Forums* _ Friday #| c 

SOCIALIST WORKERS PARTY 
YOUNG PEOPLES SOCIALIST LEAGUE 

(4th InternatioiittlSsls) 



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DO NOT FORGET 

That these were once men like you. 

That they died to defend other 
men's property. 

That as long as we have a profit 
system we will have wars to defend 
profits. 



By not joining in the fight against war 
you condemn yourself or your children 
to a fate like this. 

WORK FOR PEACE 




.561 



SOCIALIST PARTY. 549 \V. Randolph St., Chicago 



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DO YOU WANT ANOTHER WAR? 

The masters of America are getting ready for another holocaust — an- 
other World War. Three hundred thousand young men are being given 
semi-military drill in Civilian Conservation Corps, "an achievement," says 
Harry H. Woodring, Assistant Secretary of War, which "was the first real 
test of the army's plans for war mobilization." A billion dollars is being 
spent to increase the size of the United States navy. 

The war for which our rulers prepare can be stopped only by the or- 
ganization of the workers to resist it. The lessons of the last war are so 
horrible that the workers cannot allow the present drift to war to continue 
unless they care nothing for their children, their wives, their homes, their 
lives. 

In May, 1917, one month after the United States had declared war, the 
Socialist party, the only country-wide organization that consistently fought 
against the war, issued millions of leaflets which warned the workers what 
would happen. The leaflet is exactly reproduced here. 

Thousands of Socialists were then imprisoned. Eugene V. Debs was 
sentenced to ten years in Atlanta penitentiary. The entire national executive 
committee of the party was sentenced to twenty years- 

Every line of this leaflet is as true today as when it was written, and 
it has seventeen years of experience to prove its truth. 

Proclamation 

And War Program 



The Socialist Party of the United States 
in the present grave crisis, solemnly reaf- 
firms its allegiance to the principle of in- 
ternationalism and working class solidar- 
ity the world over, and proclaims its un- 
alterable opposition to the war just de- 
clared by the government of the United 
States. 

Modern wars as a rule have been caused 
by the commercial and financial rivalry 
and intrigues of the capitalist interests 
in the different countries. Whether they 
have been frankly waged as wars of ag- 
gression or have been hypocritically rep- 
resented as wars of "defense," they have 
always been made by the classes and 
fought by the masses. Wars bring wealth 
and power to the ruling classes, and suf- 
fering, death and demoralization to the 



workers. 

They breed a sinister spirit of passion, 
unreason, race hatred and false patriotism. 
They obscure the struggles of the work- 
ers for life, liberty and social justice. 
They tend to sever the vital bonds of 
solidarity between them and their brothers 
in other countries, to destroy their or- 
ganizations and to curtail their civic and 
political rights and liberties. 

The Socialist Party of the United States 
is unalterably opposed to the system of 
exploitation and class rule which is up- 
held and strengthened by military power 
and sham national patriotism. We, there- 
fore, call upon the workers of all coun- 
tries to refuse support to their govern- 
ments in their wars. The wars of the 
contending national groups of capitalist* 



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United States Unit of Service 

11 west 42nd street 

new york, n. y. 



December, 1939 



Dear Friend: 

During the pact five years we have been making a 
consistent and continuous effort to register in the con- 
sciousness of men and women everywhere the idea of active 
goodwill. 

At this holiday season we are making a special effort 
in the same direction, and we are hereby inviting you to 
cooperate, to the best of your ability, in the extension 



of the idea of goodwill. Will you cooperate in this con- 
centrated effort, both objectively and subjectively, and 
will you, as far as you are able, aistribute in your per- 
. sonal and group relations the idea of goodwill and peace, 
to be expressed both at Christmas and a month later, on 
Sunday, January 21st, as indicated in the attached message. 

As quickly and as consistently as possible the idea 
can be distributed, by many means - through church services 
and publications, through local newspaper editorials and 
mention, through club and organization groups, through 
one's personal friends; and such widespread distribution 
of the idea of goodwill at this time will have the desir- 
able effect of relieving the world tension in the conscious- 
ness of men and women everywhere. 

We shall be happy to receive from you any responsive 
word which you may be moved to send us, and we shall be 
happy also to cooperate in any way that may be possible 
in your efforts to carry forward this proposal of goodwill 
and world peace. 

Sincerely yours, 

UNITED STATES UNIT 0? SERVICE 



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REVOLUTIONARY 
Wjj± STRUGGLE 

AGAINST WAR 







By Alex Bittelman 



Price 5^ 



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The Challenge of War 

An Economic Interpretation 



By,/ 
NORMAN THOMAS 




League for Industrial Democracy 

70 Fifth Ave., New York 















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Preparedness, the Road 
to Universal Slaughter 



BY EMMA GOLDMAN 




Mother Earth Publishing Association 
20 East 125th St., New York 









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THE 



POSITIVE 



FAITH 



OF PACIFISM 



EVAN W. THOMAS, m. d. 



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GOOD- WILL WORK 

The work of the men and women of goodwill should now enter into a more 
active and practical phase, and this in spite of the critical world situation. No 
matter what may happen in the world and no matter whether the inevitable triumph 
of the Forces of Light is temporarily delayed or not, the work of promoting good- 
will and of preparing to establish a new world order must go on. 

For this reason we are actively promoting the formation of TRIANGLES 
throughout the world whose purpose is to enable units of three people to work 
at the expression of goodwill in their homes, in the community and eventually in 
the world. We have already formed over five hundred Triangles and are most 
anxious to see the growth of this effort to help. 

May I put before you the reasons why this work seems to us so promising 
and why I am asking your cooperation and your. help? Will you give a little 
time and study carefully the following reasons why we feel this? 

1. These Triangles are concerned with the science of right human relations. 
They are intended to establish goodwill between individuals, groups and nations. 

V Where goodwill exists, every kind of progressive adjustment becomes possible. 

2. These Triangles can be formed under all conditions, all circumstances and 
by people of every religious and political persuasion. They are non-political and 
non-sectarian and could eventually work in those countries whose governments are 
against the rule of love and which express no spirit of goodwill. Nevertheless, 
their ^peoples are just as anxious for goodwill as is the rest of humanity. This is 
evidenced by the fact that there are Triangles not only in the nations which form 
the Allied group, but also in Japan, Italy, and in the countries occupied by Ger- 
many. There are only a few Triangles in Germany and they are probably inactive, 
as the Nazi government would not tolerate their existence. For this the people 
are not to blame. 

3. People living in the German-occupied countries can be reached quite easily 
by this idea and will immediately go about forming Triangles of goodwill. 
Organization must necessarily be avoided, but the idea can spread. 

4. It is an intensely practical effort because it is based on the belief that it 

Lis possible to find three people (who know each other) who will stand together 
for goodwill, kindness and practical effort between themselves and in their environ- 
ment. These Triangles are dedicated to the earnest cultivation of happy, im- 
personal relations and to a determination to let goodwill to others control all 
thoughts, words and actions. 
** i 5. Each Triangle automatically becomes a little power station or focal point 

>7"Y of goodwill. Goodwill is the first expression of Christ's command to love one 

another and is the active principle of peace. There will be no lasting peace until 
there is enough goodwill in the world to make it possible. We have made the 
mistake hitherto of working for peace prior to cultivating goodwill. We have 
put the cart before the horse. 

6 Each Triangle can become creative and its members can form three other 
Triangles, for each person in the Triangle can ask two other individuals to form 
a Triangle with him. Thus nine people could be brought into cooperation, con- 
stituting three Triangles besides the original one. In this way, many hundreds of 
Triangles can be formed and literally thousands of people begin to practice and 
spread goodwill. Thus a network of Triangles can spread over the world. The 
responsibility is distributed and the idea can spread like wildfire and some day 
set the world ablaze with light, goodwill and love. 

7. The work is financially simple because each person who forms a Triangle 
shoulders the responsibility of communicating with the members of his Triangle 
and of passing on information. The expense is thus widely distributed and is 
not heavy on any one person. The only expense incurred of any importance is 
that of the central office where the list of Triangles and the names and addresses 
of the members are kept. 



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A CALL TO ACTION 

To All Men and Women of Goodwill 



Every man and woman who does not act 
has to be saved by someone who does act. 



What Can I Do? 

A. I can do all in my power to bring victory to the United Nations of 
the World in their war against the forces of evil. 

1. By helping to make the United States of America a great "Ar- 
senal for Democracy" by every possible means. 

2. By actively supporting the cause of establishing "The Four 
Freedom.',": Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Religion, Free- 
dom from Want, Freedom from Fear, for all men everywhere 
in the world, by every possible means, such as: 

a. Studying the problems of government and social organiza- 
tion necessary to the permanent establishment of these Four 
Freedoms in my own country and in the world. 

b. Actively advocating organized international cooperation to 
establish and maintain a permanent world peace based upon 
the Four Freedoms and the Atlantic Charter. 

3. By promoting unity, harmony and cooperation in my nation by 
always speaking, thinking and acting as a positive focal point 
of goodwill. 

4. By publicly approving and actively supporting and cooperating 
with all men everywhere who work for these ends. 

B. I can find two other people who agree with me in these objectives 
and unite with them as a triangle of active expression of the will 
to good, keeping constantly in touch with these two friends and 
advising the Unit of Service of my action. 

C. I can join the thousands of men and women of goodwill all over 
the world who are now using every day one of the two Great 
Universal Invocations or Prayers (see enclosed cards). 

■ a- 



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RELEASE JULY I- 20 " 

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* U—i" 8 

w Who Are the Peacemakers? 

THE NEW YORK PEACE SOCIETY. 

Secretary, President, Treasurer, 

SAMUEL T. DUTTON. ANDREW CARNEGIE. AS TOR TRUST CO. 

Mr. Morris Hillquit, ( S£p 2 Ol8?" \ 

New York City. V £■ ~~. n v^"~ ^ 

Dear Sir: X^*jSi '■.•mj^ S 

A Committee of the New York Peace Society has been appointed for the 
purpose of submitting nominations for the officers and Directors for the 
Annual Meeting to be held at the Hotel Astor on next Tuesday, and desires 
me to inquire whether or not you would be willing to accept nomination as 
Director, in case it should be offered.. While meetings of the full Board are 
not held frequently, yet, the Peace Society being incorporated, we feel that 
we must have a Board which, so far as possible, will attend meetings wnen they 
are called and assume the responsibility which naturally falls upon a Board of 
Directors. The growing interest in the peace movement, and the prominence 
of the New York Society, make it very desirable also that its Directors shall 
be men who are willing to inform themselves on the subject with which it 
deals, so that the acts of the Board may be such as to give the society rightful 
leadership in this important field. Hoping that we may hear favorably from 
you at an early date, I am ». 

Very truly yours, 
W. H. SHORT, 
Executive Secretary. 



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New York, June 12th, 1911. 
Mr. W. H. Short, 

Executive Secretary, New York Peace Society, 
507 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 
Dear Sir: 

Temporary absence from the city and an accumulation of work of all 
kinds have prevented me from answering your kind letter at an earlier date. 



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THOU SHALT NOT KILL 



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TENTATIVE PROGRAM .-. 

for the 



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SEP lt978 
First American Conferences 



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Democracy and Terms 

2 89 F i PHftihj at Of y 

/\Fifth Avenue and Thirtiel 

New York City, May 30 




A CALL TO ACTION 



It is now less than six weeks since the 
United States entered the World War. In 
that short space of time the grip of 
militarist hysteria has fastened itself 
upon the country; conscription is being 
placed upon our statute books; the per- 
nicious "gag" bill is about to be forced 
through Congress; standards to safe- 
guard labor, carefully built up through 
years, have been swept aside; the right of 
free speech has been assailed; halls have 
been closed against public discussion, 
meetings broken up, speakers arrested — 
and now the danger of a permanent uni- 
versal military training law confronts 
us. 

While all this military organization is 
going on in America, rumors of peace 
come to us from Germany, Austria, Italy 
and Russia. Shall it be said that we, the 
latest to enter the war, are less concerned 
about the early establishment of a peace 
based on justice for all? 

We call on all American citizens to 
unite with us in the First American Con- 
ference on Democracy and Terms of 
Peace, at the Holland House, on May 
30 and II, to discuss how best we can 
aid our government in bringing to our- 
selves and the world a speedy, righteous 
and enduring peace. 

May 7, 1917. 






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Alternatives, to War 




Findings of the 

UNOFFICIAL COMMISSION 

which met at the 

Holland House, New York City, March 19-24, 1917 

"to devise ways and means of a peaceful solution 
of our international crisis" 







Published by 

ency Peace Federation 
70 Fifth Avenue 
NEW YORK CITY 



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The Uf im 

AMERICAN SOCL 
AND THE WAR 



■ ■ 
A Documentary History of the Attitude of the 
Socialist Party toward War and Militarism 
Since the Outbreak of the Great 



Edited by 



<s as << -a 
<-%;&< a 

ALEXANDER TRACHTENBERC^"^ ? 

Director, Department of Labor Research, Rand School of Social -^ticBte % 

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/FJM a« Introduction by 

MORRIS HILLQUIT 

International Secretary, Socialist Party 



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PublUhed by 

THE RAND SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE 

New York City 

1917 









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fg^ ; The 
Repudiation of War 



SEP 2 197t 

&%£ , 





FANNY BIXBY'SPENCER 






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THE 



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PLANS^ o^ 

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OF SEP 2 

THE EUROPEAN 



PEACE AWARDS 



OFFERED IN 

GREAT BRITAIN, FRANCE, ITALY, 
AND GERMANY FOR " THE BEST 
PRACTICAL PROPOSALS FOR 
RESTORING PEACE AND PROSPERITY 
IN EACH OF THOSE COUNTRIES 
THRU INTERNATIONAL 
CO-OPERATION" 



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Additional copies of this pamphlet can be obtained for 
10 cents per cop^ pins mailing charges on application to 
Edward P. Pierce, Jr., 5, Park Square, Boston, Mass. 



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WHAT PRICE 



PEAC 

SEP 



<3- > 

Vrfc-copY.. 



Frederick J. Libby 




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1 1RJ NATION F! 



ONE CENT A COPY 
ONE DOLLAR A HUNDRED 

POSTAGE EXTRA 



Additional copies of this pamphlet may be obtained from the 
X National Council for Prevention of War 
532 Seventeenth Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 
Issued January, 1925 



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Christianity and World Problems: 









C ^DOLLARS AND 
WORLD PEACE 

A CONSIDEKATION OF NATIO 
INDUSTRIALISM AND IMPE 

KIRBY PAGE 

Editor, The World Tomorrow 

. 3 - ^° ' 




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NEW ^SP YORK 
GEORGE H7T50RAN COMPANY 



F/'/te<?« Cents Net. 



Christianity and World Problems 






THE MONROE DOCTRINE 
AND WORLD PEACE 



An analysis of the replies from 301 
leaders of public opinion to eight 
questions concerning the meaning and 
significance of this famous doctrine 






BY 

KIRBY 'PAGE 

editor, The World Tomorrow 





SEP 2 ''378 






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GARDEN CITY, NEW YORK 



DOUBLEDAY, DORAN & COMPANY, Inc. 



Ten Cents Net. 



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Stands fo 



PEACE 



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BY M^jtlTVlNOFF 



PRKE 1c 



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The WORLD CONGRESS 
AGAINST 




2,196 Delegates from 27 Countries 

representing 

30,000,000 people 

^ S 

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Q M W y 

Report on the Congress ^ ^ h q 
Opening Address by Romain Holland q ^ 

and the =J - g ^ 

MANIFESTO J . § a 



adopted at AMSTERDAM =J * £ - 



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August 27-29, 1932 ^^ 



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73 5 S n 

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O H 03 

Published by the a 

American Committee for Struggle Against War ^ a 
104 Fifth Avenue, Room 1811 
New York, N. Y. 



Five Cents 



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CALL 



TO THE 



U. S. CONGRESS AGAINST WAR 



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Week-End 
September 
—4, 1933 

New York City 






I Organizing Committee 
UL S. Congress Against War 
in* fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. 



We call every organization to form a united front and we appeal to every individual sincerely opposed to 
war to begin immediately the work of building this mighty rampart against the forces of war." 



aa»^pwa 



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SEP 2 01978 ' 




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MANIFESTO AND PROGRAM 
of the 

AMERICAN. LEAGUE AGAINST 

WAR AND FASCISM 

- 

Adopted at U. S. Congress Against War 
New York City, Sept. 29-0ct. 1, 1933 

Appeal to the Working Men and Women of America: 

To All Victims of War: 

The black cloud of imperialist war hangs over the world. The 
peoples must arouse themselves and take immediate action against the 
wars now going on in the Far East and Latin America, against inter- 
vention 
against 




in Cuba, against the increasing preparations for war, and 
the growing clanger of a new world war. 



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After ten years of futility, the World Disarmament Conference is 
meeting to perform once more the grim comedy of promises, to screen 
the actions of the imperialist governments which are preparing, more 
intensively than ever before in history, for a new war. The Four 
Power Pact is already exposed as nothing but a new rnanoeuver for posi- 
tion in the coming war between the imperialist rivals, and an attempt 
to establish a united imperialist front against the Soviet Union. 
The rise of Fascism in Europe and especially in Germany, and the 
sharpened aggressive policy of Japanese militarism, have brought all 
the imperialist antagonisms to the breaking point and greatly in- 
creased the danger of a war of intervention against the Soviet Union. 
The greatest naval race in history is now on among the United States, 
England and Japan. The British-American antagonism is being fought 
out in Latin-America already by open war — the so-called local wars 
being in reality struggles between these imperialist powers. The 
presence of thirty American warships in Cuban waters is itself an act 
of war against the Cuban revolution. The collapse of the World 
Economic Conference revealed only too clearly that the great pov/ers 
are unable and unwilling to solve the basic international problems 
by peaceful means and that they will resort to a new imperialist war 
in an attempt to divert the attention of the masses from their misery 
and as the only capitalist way out of the crisis. 

FASCISM BREEDS WAR 

The rapid rise of Fascism is closely related to the increasing 
war danger. Fascism means forced labor, militarization lower standards 
of living, and the accentuation of national hatreds and chauvinist in- 
citements as instruments for the "moral" preparation for war. It 
sets the people of one country against the people of another, and ex- 
ploits the internal racial ana national groups within each country in 



order to prevent 
common problems. 



them from uniting in joint action to 



.ve their 



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Positive 
War Prevention 

fly ALPHONSE H. KURSHEEDT 



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■■■■■MMMBHHMi 



THE UNITED 




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SEP 2 ONTO 



) 



STRUGGLE 2 ^ 



FOR PEACE 



By G. Dimitroff 



3 CENTS 






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WHAT 



ARE YOU GOING TO DO ABOUT IT? 

(I) 



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$F" 3 <-^ 



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SEP 2 01978 



^Ca, copy.. 



THE CASE FOR CONSTRUCTIVE PEACE 



t 







BY ALDOUS HUXLEY 



PRICE THREEPENCE 






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Do You Remember This Wartii 



1* 



KstAf fo^&tcK 




Stop This From Happening Again! 

PROTECT YOUR DOLLARS AND SAVE YOUR SONS! 
KEEP THE UNITED STATES OUT OF WAR AND WORK FOR WORLD PEACE! 



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Toward a Collective 



Peace Sv p 



■VO^rsws^tp*. 



By LOUISE LEv^ 



xtlGHT 

2 ^ 




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25 cents 



If 

ON 



THE! NATIONAL LE AGUE OF WOME N VOTERS 

726 JACKSON PLACE • WASHINGTON, D. C. 



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Jrlovo to Fight 




■ ■ 



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Isolation JpB% 
Collective Security ^^ 
Relentless Class Sfrucjcjle 



by 
JAMES BURNHAM 



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3« 



SOCIALIST WORKERS PARTY 

and 

YOUflG PEOPLES SOCIALIST LEAGUE 

(4«Ii Internationalists) 



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C / " 

Authorities on the Far East Say: v < X— . 

finest statement on the whole question I have seen."— 
Dr. Herbert Gowen, Historian, University of Washington. 

"Best statement of case yet."— Reverend John Cole Ale- 
Kim, lifelong resident of the Orient. 

"Fine!" — A Major-General, U. S. Army, retired, nation- 
ally known specialist in Pacific affairs. 



There Is (ltd 

N?f#-> s 

Hal f way 
Neutrality! 

□ 

"Efforts to Involve America Abroad 
Are Now More Elaborately Organized 
Than in 1898 or 1917. Alien Aims Are 
Plain. Only Our Strict Neutrality 
Toward All — With Favors to None — 
Can Hold Urgently Needed Trade and 
Provide a Basis for America's Con- 




By 
/RALPH TOWNSEND 

Formerly of U. S. Consular Service 
in China 



Price 10 Cents 

(3rd large printing) 



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> 7 - v 




ONCERTED 
ACTION 
FOR PEACE- 

^y HARRY fF^WARD 



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PEACE FRONT 



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JOB W^ Tl0 S *** sXQ*** 



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LBA3I PEACE ACTION COOCM 



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Scott Z, Cray 
Executive SecreXj^gr 
294 ITew Scotland 
Alt any, New York 





January 21, 1941 










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Because of America's increasing involvement In ^present war, the 
Alhany Peace Action Council has decided to call an EMEEBMGT PEACE 
COira-SBMCJ, inviting all those in the Capital District - Schenectady, Troy, 
Hidson, and Alhany - interested in keeping America from the misery and 
destruction raging in Europe and Africa. 

This conference will he held Fehruary 2, 1941 at the Pcurth Preshyterian 
Church on Ilorth Pearl Street in Alhany at 2 P. M.- We cordially i nvite you 
and memhers of your organization to attend. 

We -o-pe that through this conference we shall he ahle not only to 
discuss""the situation facing us today, hut also to decide upon a course 
of action which would effectively organize the peace sentiments of cui 
people. 

The present emergency is a very real one. As Senator Wheeler has stated, 
we are heing dragged into war not step hy step, hut leap hy leap, ihe 
greatest lean so far is the proposed hill known as the "Lend-lease ' Dill. 
This hill would hring war' and dictatorship at tne same time. In order „o 
prevent this, in order to defend our American Democrat ic Jay o fU e ^ we 
feel that positive and immediate action must he taken. Bfe feel that tne 
American people have ccme to realize what the issues are, wnat is at stake, 
£J «K the? want a program which will clearly and unmistakahly aemonatrate 
their desire for peace to our Congressmen and our President, and which will 
carry that desire into action. 

A. successful and well-attended peace conference can hring to the Capital 
District a new and powerful peace movement, like those springing up all 
over America. Let us know if you can attend the conference; tell others. 

It is not too late. The people of our country can yet save America from 
the "Blackout of Peace and Democracy". 

Alhany peace Action Council 



Scott K, Cray t/ f/ 
Executive Secretary 




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WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA PEACE COUNCIL 



701 Investment Building ■ 6 

L>l • ■ i 0""<T 7 - April 11, 1941 



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Dear Friend: \^copy - s ^/ 

Shall it be war or shall it be peace! Are we to live as free men r-*e^jects 
of a dictatorship! Shall our families have security or want and privationl^These 
-vre the questions facing the American people today. /$&* 3 '<* 

Two specific issues in the war drive of our Administration call ftnf> JJ»P W< 
action. "They are: the convoying of U.S. ships and anti-strike W s ^^«' J^ 
American Peace Mobilization therefore issues the following resolutions and we>/ 
call upon all friends of peace, liberty and the common welfare to act accordingly. 



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WHEREAS: It has been historically proven that the convoying of ships in 1917 
was the final step toward armed belligerency, and 

WHEREAS- All Americans recognize that armed convoys and the transferring of 
merchant ships to Great Britain present an imminent danger of involvement in 

World War #2, and . - ■ , . , 

WHEREAS^ The Administrative circles are attempting to risk such involvement^ 

iosnito the fact that the American people have shown timo and time again in various 

publiQ opinion, polls and demonstrations that thoy are unalterably opposed to any 

military adventures abroad, thoroforo be it 

RESOLVED • That tho Westorn Pennsylvania Peace Council, reflecting the will 01 

the' majority, hereby declares that it opposes unconditionally any law, docroo or 

presidential fiat which permits Amor icon merchant ships and seamen to enter non- 

noutral wators. 

WHEREAS: Thu right to striko which is tho workingman's only protection against 
tho enemies of labor, faces tho throat, and penalties of the electric chair and pen- 
itontiary sontonccs, and 

WHEREAS: Congress and tho legislative bodies of the various states seek to 
halt tho organization of the unorganized and to woaken tho trade union movement 
by illogalizing all strikes and attempts on tho part of tho workers to organize 
thomsolvos into unions of thoir own choico, and 

WHEREAS: This anti-labor onslaught is only the opening wodgo m a drivo to 
«ipo out tho trade union movement and .ho b uck bono of tho peace sentiment, to 
^rush tho just domands for increases in v/agos to moot tho over increasing^ cost of 
living, and to wipe out all progrossivo social legislation, thoroforo bo it 

RESOLVED- That tho Westorn Pennsylvania Poaco Council horoby launches a cam- 
paign wherein wo call upon tho pooplo of Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania to 
rally to tho causo of domestic poaco and to protect tho democratic rights that 
Labor has achiovod. 

Wo invito you and/or your organization to join with us in this campaign against 
onvoys and anti-labor legislation. Organizations - go on record a s being opposed 

Iho conveying of ships! Defend the right to striko. Send the enclosed post 
-<rds of protest to President Roosovolt, White House, Washington, D.C. Begin now 
y Toeing your organization and your friends to deluge tho Capitol with post cards 
' protest. Send to this office for bulk supplies of sucn cards. ACT NOW. 

Sincerely yours, 

THE "'j/ESTERN PENNSYLVANIA PEACE COUNCIL 

Tod Sottlomyor, Chairron 



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BARUCH OVER CONGRESS 



OCKEFELLER OVER THE WORLD 



By HENRY H. f^LON 



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CHICAGO ; 





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The People against 
the Warmakers ! 



by EUGENE DENNIS 



30 



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WORLD REPUB LH 




SEP 2 1978 



welcomes you to . .:ue* 

■■-- , — , iv>> 



DINNER 



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Tonight 



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JUNE 6, 1947 
The Third Anniversary of D-Day 

Grand Ballroom 
Hotel Sherman 

A REPORT FOR PEACE 



Seven O'clock 



Informal 



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CALL TO THE 

American 
Continental 
Congress for 

PEACE 




MEXICO CITY 
Sept. 5 -Sept. 10 





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.SOME IDEOLOGICAL 
C QUESTIONS ON THE 
STRUGGLE .CE 



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Material for Classes and Study Groups ; 
for Speakers, Instructors and xA.ctive Wor kers 

in the Fight for Peace /$& "Ij^fes 



Issued by 

National Education Department, Communist Party 
35 East 1 2th Street, New York 3, N. Y. 

August 1950 
Price 10* .-j^fc.209 




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WHO WANTS 



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6/- pSTsTA *2- 4- 

CONGRESS OF THE PEOPLES FOR PEACE 
Vienna, December 12th- 19th, 1952 



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SEP 2 01978 



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DOCUMENTS 



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Only the Peoples.. 



Having won a truce in Korea, the peoples of 
the world must exert unceasing effort to win 
the peace in the coming political negoti 

by FREDERICK vT FIELD 



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THE PEOPLE of the world have 
won a truce in Korea. They 
have brought such pressure to bear 
upon those groups which wanted the 
war to continue that their will, the 
people's will, prevailed. This is a 
great victory. It is a step forward 
on the long and difficult road to 
peace. Our rejoicing is not tarnished 
by the half-heartedness and forebod- 
ing warnings with which the truce 
was officially greeted by the top lead- 
ers of our nation. 

The people of the world can, and 
must, now win the further steps to- 
wards peace which are to be fought 
for in the forthcoming political ne- 
gotiations. 

Americans of all walks of life 
shared in the partial victory that has 
been won. It was their overwhelm- 
ing sentiment, together with that of 
the' masses throughout the world, 
which made it mandatory for Presi- 
dent Eisenhower to overrule the 
powerful pro-war elements in his 
administration and in the military 
over the cease-fire fssue. 

Pressure from the people, pres- 
sure for peace, for negotiation, pres- 
sure against war, against diplomatic 
blackmail, pressure for mere moral 
decency in human relations, pres- 
sure that is organized and clear in 




its purposes — only such pressure can 
force any kind of real settlement of 
the Korean issue. Such pressure won 
the armistice. It must now organize 
itself to wy^^npjitical negotia- 
tions. /O* |^%v 

Senator Sppkma^n.^a Democrat 
who hdsi'f rom timW 4$&ie\ spoken 
out milaty-, against the pro/-fascist 
elements among ; the Republicans, 
said a few weeks- agtr'that in his 
opinion if a Korean truce finally be- 
came effective "our troubles will only 
have started." This idea was the 
theme of the grudging statements 
made by Dulles, Clark, Taylor and 
others on the historic occasion of 
the cease-fire agreement. To them, 
of c6urse, the trouble will come 
from the North Koreans and the 
Chinese. But this is not so. The 
trouble will come, as it has through- 
out the truce negotiations, from the 
American side. It will come from the 
powerful minority within this coun- 
try for whom General Van Fleet 
spoke when he said "There had to 
be a Korea, either here or some- 
where else in the world. There had 
to be a Korea to put our defense in 
good shape." 

The key to a prevailing peace in 
Korea, as in other parts of the world, 
lies in the fine slogan put forward 



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PROFESSOR 
FREDERIC 

JOLIOT-CURIE 



OPENING 
ADDRESS 



VIENNA SESSION OF THE WORLD 

COUNCIL OF PEACE 

NOVEMBER 23rd-28th, 1953 



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ILYA EHRENBURG 






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SPEECH 



DELIVERED TO THE 
WORLD COUNCIL OF PEACE 






VIENNA SESSION, NOVEMBER 23rd-28th, 1953 



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A2. 

James P. Warburg 



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A NON-PARTISAN STUDY TO HELP THE INDEPENDENT VOTER 
IN SUPPORTING A POSITIVE AMERICAN PROGRAM FOR PEACE 



CONTENTS 



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"Fresh from the People" 

The Fleshless Bones of 
Bipartisan Policy 

Building Toward Peace in the 
Atomic Age 

Food, Fuel and Power 

Know-how and Capital 

Trade Among Nations 

Colonialism The Challenge of 

Bandung 



The United States, the United 
Nations and Disarmament 

Background of Today's 
Tensions 

Most Likely Causes of 
World War III 

Preventive Action in Europe 

Preventive Action in Asia 

Relaxing Tensions in the 
Uncommitted Areas 

Responsibility in an 
Election Year 



25 VandcrbiK Ave. 



Ntw York City 



HOW THE 



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iPERRED TO IN THIS SENSATIONAL 
WS ITEM I 

VING A SENSATIONAL PREVIEW OF THE \ jt>?S%r 
ND OP FUTURE FOR THE WORLD THAT THE %&&" 
SSIANS ARE EXPECTING! V^ 



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From: AAmeri can Nobel Center 

tO West End Aven ue , N .Y. 

Tel. R19-0953 x£3^ "^"X 

For Immediate Release /^ A 
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\\; iPY ... 

The American Nobel Center will hold a forum dls cuss iolTTrrr- "Educa- 
tion for Peace" at the Women's International Exposition, Madison 
Square Garden, at 5:00 P.M., Wednesday, November 14th. Dr. Henry A. 
Atkinson, Director of the Church Peace Union, pgffi"fo(£QE£&o r at o r and 
representatives of eight organizations exhibifci^fr£(j:}g^AiVorican 
Nobel Center's booth at the exposition will i o^^ ^'^Qn dirs cus si o n . 
Mrs. Hjordis Swenson, chairman of the Center, will bo the chairman. 

The participating organizations will be represented by the 
following speakers: Marie Ragonctti for the American Association for 
the United Nations, Inc.; Yaroslav J. Chyz for the Common Council for 
American Unity; Mary 0. Lombard for the East and West Association; 
Michael Streit for the Free World Association; Dr. Rachel Du Eois for 
the Intercultural Education Workshop; Miriam Stuart for the Society 
for the Prevention of World War Throe; Dr. Carl Herman Voss for the 
World Alliance for International Friendship through the Churches; and 
Mrs. Gcrda Schairer for the World Christmas Festival. 

The American Nobel Center's booth will be open throughout the 
exposition, from Tuesday, November loth through Sunday, November 18th, 
from noon untill 11:00 P.M. 



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American Asso ci ation for the United Nations, Inc . 
45 East 65th Street, i.1 .'I .C . 

The American Association for the United Nations, a nation-wide 
membership crganization, is devoted exclusively to a program of study 
and po% liv.cation on the Jni-tod Marions and its related agencies. 

The Association's aim is three-fold: 1. Promote popular study of the 
Charter and the specialized agencies; 2. To build up public opinion 
in support of a foreign policy to make effective our membership in 
the united Nations; 5. To study and advise on ways the Charter can 
be improved and expanded to moot the changing needs of this changing 
v;orld , 



Through national headquarters , fifteen re . .1 offices, 



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TENTATIVE 

POLITICAL PLATFORM OF 

le u NeW Economics and World Peace Party'' 

As Based On The Declaration That 

THE PROBLEM OF WORLD PEACE AND PROSPERITY 

IS A MONEY PROBLEM. 






The following political platform of the New Economics 
and World Peace Party has been formulated out of and 
in harmony with the so-called "Martians Plan for World 
Peace and Prosperity." This plan is the culmination of 
more than thirty years uninterrupted study and research 
by members of the American Society of Martians into 
the causes of warfare between nations, of constantly in- 
creasing national indebtedness, of currency and industrial 
disturbances, of poverty, crime, etc. The principal con- 
tention in the Martians' plan is that the problem of world 
neace and prosperity is a money problem. This conten- 

>n is used both as the text and foundation of the Party 

itform which is as follows : 



We, the New Economics and World Peace Party, un- 
equivocally declare that the root causes of military war- 
fare and of practically all social and economic troubles 
which so widely prevail throughout the civilized world 
arise out of the present privately controlled money, 
credit and banking systems. These systems are no- 
toriously unstable, intricate and confusing. Taken as a 
whole, they form a complex of values impossible for the 
average mind to understand. All are fraudulently de- 
fective and even more fraudulently manipulated by a 
group of international bankers and gold-brokers which 
controls and deliberately sustains these dishonest 
systems, systems which inflict monstrous injustices upon 
all classes of business, agricultural and labor interets. 

We are contending that with an honest monetary sys- 
tem in general operation, of decimal denominations of 
the unit 100, uuiversally stabilized, governmental con- 
trolled and operated, a virtual Utopian social and in- 
dustrial order would not be an idle dream but a practical 
possibility. In other words, we contend that to estab- 
lish such a monetary system, conducted in the interests 
of nations would prove to be the greatest blessing making 
for world peace and prosperity ever bestowed upon the 
human race. 






Future world peace, human progress and prosperity 
absolutely depends upon a substantial change in the 
orld's monetary systems. This change is imperative 
1 must take place before world financial and industrial 
hditions can become materially improved, and before 
universal good will and co-operation between nations 
can be assured. 



We declare that the creation of money and control of 
I and banking are natural governmental prei 



tives. Therefore, in the interest of world peace and 
prosperity, we demand that all money-creating, credit 
and banking powers be taken out of private control to be 
exercised solely by governments in the interest of their 
respective nations and peoples. 

If at this point the question is raised as to what right 
have we as American citizens to demand that other gov- 
ernments than our own comply with our request for the 
general nationalization of monetary and banking powers, 
our answer is, first : That citizens of any country are 
also citizens of the world and possess the inherent right 
to demand that world peace be established by any means 
which they believe such object can be attained. Second : 
That the political and religious creed of the American 
Society of Martians is that of Thomas Paine, who said : 
"The world is my country and to do good is my religion." 

Had sovereign governments in the past exercised 
their transcendent prerogative — the right to coin and is- 
sue money and control its national functions — there 
would have been no World War, no twenty million war 
victims, no Versailles treaty, no Dawes plan, no war 
debts,— -debts which have resulted in binding some 500 
million business men, farmers, workers and their posterity 
in financial bondage to a private Money Oligarchy for 
several generations, if not in perpetuity. 

The story so widely and persistently circulated that 
Germany was solely guilty of the World War is a damn- 
able falsehood which imperatively needs to be wiped out 
and the victim cleared of the charge. Germany's admis- 
sion of guilt and signing of the Versailles treaty, as every 
well-informed man knows, were done for the purpose of 
saving Germany from ruthless invasion by her enemies. 
As a matter of truth and fairness, none of the nations 
were primarily responsible for the war. 

It is universally admitted that the surface causes of the 
Great war were the prevailing furious competition be- 
tween nations for supremacy in commerce and industry; 
the fight for markets, resources and trade routes; the 
ambition to expand, to exploit and undersell. Though 
these are the generally admitted visible causes of the 
war, yet they do not constitute the invisible or root 
causes of the conflict. The root causes of the war was 
the desire of a certain class of men and institutions to 
make billions in money by creating vast debts. 

One of America's most prominent citizens spoke the 
truth when he -.aid. "War conies from n source b< vond 



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PEOPLES PEACE COMMITTEE OF CLEVELAP /y 



^ Program of Community Discussion and Action 








-cretarial Offices • 807 Prospect-Fourth Building • Phone MAin 6086 



PROGRESS REPORT /^^ 

« S£r 978 

We are off to a good start. \%, Copy 

As you know, the Peoples Peace Committee of Cleveland is attempting^ touring 
about a community-wide discussion of the many issues of a peoples peace. 

We began with an Institute at Cleveland College on June 20th, and the response to 
that event was warm and enthusiastic. 

Very close to 400 attended the afternoon and evening sessions. Of these, 

115 volunteered to enlist their organizations in the fall program. 

57 more volunteered to help organize new discussion groups. 

107 promised to enroll as discussion leaders. 

128 agreed to be members of leadership training groups with other discussion 

leaders. 

.... 40 said they would interest other people in volunteering for discussion leader- 
ship. 

49 pledged their time for telephone work, and 30 for office work. 

We think that is a good start, but we would like to improve on it. And so we are 
sending you this report, inviting your further cooperation. 

On the next page we are asking you carefully to fill out and return to us a check 
sheet indicating your willingness to help in this program, so vital to everyone. 

On the 3rd and 4th pages are statements explaining the financial needs and giving 
a brief synopsis of the total program. Your careful reading of these also will be greatly 
appreciated. 

Faithfully yours, ^. — •_ ^— ^^ 



; 





JA&*****>**. 




Judge Daniel E. Morgan, General Chairman • Cyril J. Bath, Treasurer • Charles F. MacLennan, Executive Secretary 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Mrs. Charles Bang 

Cyril J. Bath 

Rev. Arthur J. Culler 



Allen Y. King, Chairman • Judge Perry B. Jackson, Vice-Chairman 

Mabel Head I. L. Kenen Richard E. Reisinger 

Ernest Howard Very Rev. Msgr. Robert B. Navin Rabbi Rudolph M. Rosenthal 

Herbert C. Hunsafcer Helen Phelan Rev. D. R. Sharpe 



Faye Stephenson 

Rev. Howard M. Wells 

Mrs. Harold G. Whitcomb 



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Revolutionary Policy Alone € 
Defeat Imperialist War 



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Statement of the National Committee, Workers Party, U.S. 




1. The armies of Italian Fascism, after 
months of deliberate preparation, have now 
launched their attack upon the Ethiopian 
peoples. Driven by the intolerable strains of 
internal social and economic contradictions, 
Mussolini and the Italian bourgeoisie seek a 
solution in open imperialist aggression against 
the 1 ' of the independent nations of Africa. 

2 e outbreak of war in Africa demon- 

-traWte^rhat the conflicts of world imperialism 
i'ljive reached the stage of armed struggle for 
a re-making of boundaries, and a re-division 
i{ territories and colonial possessions. Though 
the Italian campaign in Ethiopia may not 
lead immediately and directly to a world 
struggle of the imperialist powers, this delay 
■an prove no more than temporarv. THE 
WAR IN ETHIOPIA MUST BE UNDER- 
STOOD AS THE PRELUDE TO THE 
VEW IMPERIALIST WORLD WAR. 

Expose the Bandit League 

3. In the preparation for the Italian seiz- 
ure of Ethiopia, the League of Nations has 
mce more demonstrated beyond any possible 
loubt its true role. The League is not in any 
sense whatever "the defender of peace." It is 
he legal and hypocritical cover for the man- 
■uvering of the dominant imperialist powers, 
■iince Ethiopia first invoked League assistance 
n December, 1934, the negotiations have 
ierved to permit uninterrupted preparation for 
he war by Italy, and to deter defensive pre- 
paration by Ethiopia. The League has been 
itilized above all to serve the ends of British 
'i [i' n. Behind its cover, the agents of 



r fnTT ni 



fi"' ,tain, France and Italy have haggled 
iver t^fprice in terms of treaties, guarantees, 
irotection, and territories, which each was 
nlling to pay to preserve its own interests. 
Hie threat of League sanctions has been made 
■■■■■■ Ethiopia I'hich the T pa • ■■ < ■ < : 



itself offered to sacrifice — but to safeguard 
British colonial possessions and lines of com- 
munication, and to try to close the opening 
for Germany in Central Europe. The League 
of Nations is the agency, not of peace, but of 
imperialist aggression. 

THE STRUGGLE AGAINST IMPERI- 
ALIST WAR DEMANDS THE UNREMIT- 
TING EXPOSURE OF THE LEAGUE OF 
NATIONS*. 

4. No less than the European powers is 
United States imperialism bound by the iron 
chain of cause and effect to the events in 
Africa and to the new world conflict which 
they herald. The sentimental dream of U. S. 
isolation, Roosevelt's promises that the U. S. 
will remain '"free and untangled," have no more 
force than the unctuous phrases of Wilson in 
1916. The U. S. will, on the contrary, play 
the dominant and decisive role in the new im- 
perialist struggle. Behind its pacifist cover- 
ing, the Roosevelt government is pouring more 
funds into its war machine than any other 
nation in the world. Both navy and army 
are constructed on a purely offensive strategic 
basis. The U. S. bourgeoisie, waiting and 
preparing, expects to intervene in the later 
stages of the world struggle, when the other 
nouns are mutually exhausted, to achieve the 
world domination of U. S. finance-capital. 

THE STRUGGLE AGAINST IMPERI- 
ALIST WAR IS ABOVE ALL THE 
STRUGGLE AGAINST U. S. IMPERIAL- 
ISM. 

Against Stalinist Betrayal 

5. THE U.S.S.R. cannot avoid implica- 
tion in the world conflict. The very life of the 
worker.--' state is threatened by the approach 

r' war \ central task of the struggle against 
irnpe h list war is the defense of the U.S.S.R. 
Hut, in the last analvsis, this defense can be 



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APRIL 



uiam %pli$nutm 

?IL 5-6, NEWWAWCirv ' 




^jpp& 



To Organize Against War, making effective the 

tremendous anti-war sentiment of the American peo- 
ple to build a powerful organization for Peace, Liber- 
ty, and the Common Welfare. 

At the Foot of the "Great Tri-Boro Bridge", 

30,000 people will pack the Stadium to greet the 
delegates of the American people, from mine, mill, 
factory, shop, farm, and office. A great cement 
horseshoe, gala with the flags of the forty-eight states 
and the Union, jammed with people come to listen 
to Reverend Thompson's keynote speech, to Paul 
Robeson, Earl Robinson, and the American People's 
Chorus — to listen and to stage the greatest fighting 
demonstration for peace in our country's history. 

Then it's "On to Washington" on Monday 

April 7. State and regional delegations will meet 
Saturday to choose their representatives, and make 
plans for the monster protest to Capitol Hill, when 
the administration will be given a first-hand chance 
to find out what the American people really think 
about war! 



L 



g HOW e^Ctl 

^"< /- \ ^ > 

KEEP AM 
OUT O 

CONGRESS 
succeed . 




^ SEP 2 o !978 




People said, "To succeed, the peace organizations ought to get together." 

SO THEY DID! At a Memorial Day Anti-War Congress in Washinglon, 
D. C. in May, 1938, nationally known peace leaders, educators, youth, trade- 
in, farm, women, and church leaders launched the KEEP AMERICA OUT 
^ WAR CONGRESS. It was the logical successor to the Emergency Peace 
Oimpaign of 1936-38. 

The national peace organizations cooperating in the Keep America Out of 
War Congress are: 



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Cooperating Organizations 

American Friends Service Committee (Peace Section) 
Fellowship of Reconciliation ----- 
National Council for Prevention of War 

War Resisters League 

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom 
World Peace Commission of the Methodist Church 
World Peaceways 



Represented by 

Ray Newton 

A. J. Muste 
Frederick J. Libby 
Abraham Kaufman 
Dorothy Detzer 
Charles F. Boss, Jr. 
J. Max Weis 



Its National Chairman is John T. Flynn, well-known economist, author, and 
financial columnist. The National Governing Committee is composed of 
representatives of all the cooperating organizations plus thirteen members 
elected by the National Anti-War Congress. 



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N he Basis for a Just reac 

SOK'IE PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS* 

v U f SEP 1 1978 

Preamble. \%, „ 

The following points are suggested as a basifc^'disfiin^ji 
cussion (when the appropriate moment arrives) between 
the belligerent Powers. They would, of course, be put 
forward after consultation between the Alliesthemselves. 
We regard the proposal for effective guarantees of 
permanent peace (4) as exceeding all other points in im- 
portance; and we recognize that this is mairdsMiCjjfiiijjjJi&fcv. 
on the goodwill of the nations and thein^BvernSients. s $ 

'Basis of 'Discussion between 'melf^rlmrsT 




(1) Successful Invasion should not at^feftL&^iiStify -■/ 
Annexation. ^>> 1. - -"— --^ 

{a) Restoration of independence of Belgium, Serbia 
and Montenegro. Full compensation to Belgium. 

(b) Restoration of territories invaded by both sides 
subject to any readjustment under (2) (a). This to 
involve the restoration to Germany of her colonial 
territories or an equivalent. 

(2) Reasonable satisfaction of: 

(«) Demands for the application of the principle of 
nationality in Europe, by readjustment of frontiers, 
autonomy or other solution. 

{b) Demands of the Central Powers and other 
European States for increased economic opportunity in 
economically undeveloped countries. ' 

(3) Widest possible application of the principle of the 
Open Door. 

(4) Acceptance by both sides of effective guarantees 
against war on land or sea by the establishment of a 
permanent system for the pacific settlement of all inter- 
national disputes. Such a system should involve limita- 
tion of armaments. 

(5) Reference to a Conference of belligerents and 
neutrals, or to permanent Commissions, of the detailed 
working out of the above on the basis of the principles 
agreed to by the belligerents. 

*..;- Address, Hon. Sec, 3, Mayfield Road, Tunbridge Wells. 






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or a sew 



WOKIJI WAR 



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ONE PENNY EACH 



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'AGENTS OF PEACE 



by Albert E. Kahn 



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five cents 






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WE WILl HAVE 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



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Ahsw 





REGARDING THE WORK AND 
OF THE 

Peoples Peace Co 
of Cleveland 

JUDGE DANIEL E. MORGAN General Chairman 

ALEXANDER J. BRADY Treasurer 

CHARLES F. MacLENNAN Executive Secretary 

Executive Committee 

ALLEN Y. KING Chairman 

JUDGE PERRY B. JACKSON V ice-Chairman 

Mrs. Charles Bang Msgr. Robert B. Navin 

Alexander J. Brady Helen Phelan 

Rev. Arthur ]. Culler Richard E. Reisinger 

William M. Davy Rabbi R. M. Rosenthal 

Mabel Head R ev . D. R. Sharpe 

Ernest Howard Faye Stephenson 

Herbert C. Hunsaker Rev. Howard M. Wells 

Mrs. Harold G. Whitcomb 

Secretarial Offices — 807 Prospect-Fourth Building 
Phone MAin 6086 



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Jr (i ^.z-f 

HOW WOULD YOU PREVENT FOTURkWARfr? 



I was asked by the Insti 
tions for preventing future 
visionary, I admit, but I am 
world and eliminate war. 




to outline my sugges- 

recommendations — 

of them will unite the 



By pulpit, forum, newspaper, magazine, stage and radio, educate the 
human race for peace by teaching world cooperation — social, political 
and economic. Amend existing national constitutions by democratic 
procedure, i.e., by popular vote. 

Survey world needs and world resources. Pool world brains, inven- 
tions, discoveries, energy, land and raw materials for world production 
and consumption. Since power machinery makes abundance /or all 
possible now for the first time in the history of the world, plan an abun- 
dance economy limited only by rational conservation policies. 

Eliminate the profit motive because the competition it sets up among 
men and nations is the principal cause of world strife. Discontinue the 
age-old practice of buying and selling, and instead, ration commodities 
by the use of certificates or stamps issued by the world government to 
be cancelled when used. To end bribery, graft, gambling, stealing, ex- 
ploitation and extortion, make the certificates so personalized that they 
would be as non-transferable as driving permits. 

Balance production and consumption by measuring both in terms of 
exact units of energy, rather than by fluctuating dollars and cents. Let 
the world government issue no more energy-certificates than there are 
concurrently goods available for filling the world's needs. 

Grant world citizenship to people of good will only — i.e., to those who 
are willing to cooperate with hand and head to raise the standard of 
living for all. Issue world energy-certificates to no others. 

Do you ask what to do with people who refuse to work? The right 
kind of education would reduce their number tremendously. The incor- 
rigibles should receive the necessities of existence only and not the abun- 
dance of good things that could and should be enjoyed by all people 
of good will. 

-*" 

MININE FROST RANDS. 



Washington 12, D. C. 
GE. 3199 









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PEACE NOW! 



77ie Basis of a Settlement 



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THIpWAR RES1STERS' INTERNATIONAL 
If,' ABBEY ROAD, ENFIELD 
MIDDLESEX, ENGLAND 



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WAR 

AGAIN 

TO-MOR 



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y NEMO 






Struggle for the World Market 

WAR in Far East 

Latin America In Flames 

WAR Clouds over Europe 

Imperialist Armaments (Facts and Figures) 

Danger of Intervention 

What the Coming War will be like 

WAR C^-IMPERIALIST WAR 

^ WORKERS' LIBRARY PUBLISHERS 
P.O. BOX 148. STA. NEW YORK CITY 



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^War on War 



Campaign Textb^^T 3^ 

SEP 2 01978 
Frederick J/'Libby 



"TA* American People can end mar in our time if they get 
«n the joe. Let us wage peace." — Gen. John F. O'Ryah 



Published by 

THEmATIONAL COUNCIL FOR REDUCTION 

OF ARMAMENTS 

532 Seventeenth St. N.W., Washington, D. C. 



10 cents postpaid 
12 copies for $1.00 



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TWOPENCE EACH 






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* TO HELL WITH 
WAR 



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by 

J. Snook, D*C.M* 





An Appeal to Ex-Service 
:: Men and Others :: 



(Second Edition) 



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Published by the National Command, Labour League 

oj Ex-Servicemen, 376, Grays Inn Road, 

London, W.C 



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Lionaire.I wouli" bv 
o5" iiphlet and fllstribute 
' ^ /inhabitants Of thi» count 
■W «•"• " o' V> ./I should make an Or-ier in Coun"6 

■? 6 4° O- V ^ ial offence not to have read and 

be able to pass an examination in the contents of the 

9oamphlet . slwo i mtimllliw **! '"'«'"' tliinpm.T nhewlfl , 
Jff i we re a brave ma n.f undertake the distribution of 
the paranhlet to evetyBody that I happened to meet in 
the street, making a special point of presenting copies 
to the young. As I am none of these things, I can 
only hope *^ somebody who has more »oney, authority 
and ply 
tag " 




.VT 



^ 





have will" undertake the task of bring- 
to the, notice » f » «»plf\ The^ young 

I su*ryv> »- il- J- 



are said to be in favour of war. War books and 
r films ore even said to allure them with the entice 
tnent of adventure. If this is so, it is because the 
films and books are not made horrible enough, ihe censoi 
not allowing us to see what Governments, AJder us to do 
This oamphlet is realistic, w^Jisn 4 ; » neVrfff horrible - so 
much so that I J efy any young nerson to feel that war is 

■■■■MiiiM.ii iiiiimi mk ■ 



gr reading It/' / * . 



with i 
foreword 

Lt.-Colone 
t Arthur 
"*Psburn, 



D.S.O. 



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Who Leads for Peace and 



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isarmame 

I 

By Clarence P. Oakes 



This pamphlet is intended for the attention 



nt? 





I 



OThe purpose of this pamphlet is to give genuine peace workers 
zfinite information and tests which may help them to guard against 
^Mmeommunist penetration and perversion of sincere peace action. 

It is printed and distributed at the expense of the author. Those 
sympathy wiLl please help circulate it. 



• 



2. School authorities and^parentj ~ 4n _^ 



1. Students and others interested 
various peace action movements. 

,/y 4 :... 3 

3. School and local newspapers. 

\<%. copy. 

t. Officials of patriotic organizations,. 

5. Officers and members of radical 
school organizations. 

6. Officers and members of organiza- 
tions opposing school radicals. 



... 






Until present supply is exhausted additional copies of 

VULTURES IN DOVES' FEATHERS 

and 

WHO LEADS FOR PEACE AND DISARMAMENT? 

w."' je sent, without charge, upon receipt of stamped, self-addressed envelope. 



OAKES PRINTING COMPANY 
P. O. Box 461 

Independence, Kansas 



CLARENCE P. OAKES 
226 East 12th St. 
New York, N. Y. 



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A Statesmanship of Peace: 
If Not War, Then What? 
Spain - and the Next War! 



thV 6 ! 









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John Haynes Holmes 



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v Published by 

The War Resisters League 

171 WEST 12th STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 



30» 






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THE PEOPLE'S COUNCIL 

For Democracy and Peace 

— , 



HOW IT STARTED 













The idea of the People's Council grew out of the First 
American Conference for Democracy and Terms of Peace, 
held in New York on May 30 and 31. On the afternoon of 
May 31, the Conference elected an Organizing Committee 
which was instructed "to organize a permanent delegated 
People's Council from all sympathetic groups, to give im- 
mediate and permanent effect to the resolutions of the First 
American Conference for Democracy and Terms of Peace." 
When the plans for the Council were launched at the Madi- 
son Square Garden mass meeting, over 15,000 oeoole cheered 
the announcement as the climax of the epoch-making Con- 
ference. 

THE PURPOSE OF THE COUNCIL 

The purpose of the Council as express 

lutions adopted by the First American Coh*&ence fa r _.P- 

mocracy and Terms of Peace is: 

I. To secure an early, democratic and general peace 
in harmony with the principals outlined by New Russia, 
namely : 

No forcible annexations. 

No punitive indemnities. 

Free development for all nationalities. 

II. To urge international organization for the main- 
tenance of world peace. 

III. To urge our government to state concretely 
the terms upon which it is willing to make peace. 















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special to Authors, 

Oxford U the home of First-class Book, Catalogue 

and Pamphlet Work. The most modern machinery 

and type for thi» purpose has been installed by 

FOX, JONES & Co., 

PRINTERS, 

Book, Catalogue and 
Pamphlet Specialists. 



Let us quote you for you next Pamphlet or Book. 

Estimates Free. All enquiries treated in striet 

confidence. Remember the Address:— 

Kemp Hall, High Street, Oxford 

(opposite the Market) 



READ THE 



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^xn^t v> n^rn n 



The only Daily Paper . 

that tells the truth about 
Militarism and what it \ 

costs the Workers. 



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NATIONAL DEFENSE 




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A CH ALLENGEi' 

I challenge any person to state any reasoif < 
serve as sufficient or adequate ground for deck 
nation to another in these days 

Causes of war are disputes and should be settled by arbitration 
or legal procedure. What are some of the causes of war as represent- 
ed to the public? 

First: Circumstances or events that involve national honor. 

Wherein does killing by wholesale — the massacre of millions of 
the enemy and perhaps as many of your own people — the bombing 
of villages, town and cities— retrieve or avenge or maintain the 
honor of any nation? Does it not drag honor in the mire? Is honor 
more likely to be maintained by persons "seeing red" or by the calm 
and deliberate procedure of arbitration by the best minds among a 
nation's people . J 

Second : Circumstances or conditions involving vital interests. 

Wherein are vital interests furthered or maintained by collective 
homicide, the sacrifice of millions of persons innocent of wrongdoing 
or thought toward each other? Does it not seem reasonable to as- 
sume that the vital interests of any nation would be far better sus- 
tained bv peaceable procedures ensuring the preservation of property 
rather than by destructive methods? 

Third: The preservation of rights in a foreign country. 

Again I ask, wherein does the extermination of legions ol lives 
— the greatest possible number of opponents that can be killed 
maintain with justice the rights of any foreigners in a land other 
than their own? If the laws or practices of am land do not suit. 
let foreigners keep away. We claim the right to make laws to suit 
ourselves. We must grant that same right to every other country. 
Win should anv country dare to claim the right to interfere with or 

dictate the laws of another' 

Then- are causes of war which are not publicly announced hut 
which are falsely represented as national honor: vital interests, et 
cm tera. To misrepresent these to the people of any country by false 

aganda is the most gigantic betrayal, the must colossal wrong, 
thai can be perpetrated upon a people. 

V hat i ■ In i-\ en countn b(-f the world war. for 

- ! nrrl Robert O n'l : -aid: "if the situation had been known to 






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^CHURCH and COtE?©^ 



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DENOUNCE 



vp 181978 



. <* 



PACIFIST PLEDG 




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GENERAL JOHN J. PERSHING: 

"I am unalterably opposed to any pledge 
which would require Americans to fail in duty 
to their country either in time of peace or in 
time of war. I consider that any citizen who 
signs the pledge quoted in Judge Parker's letter 
guilty of a treasonable act and I would favor a 
law disfranchising any such unworthy citizens." 









\, 




H^VATIONAL CIVIC FEDERATION 

33rd Flooe, Metropolitan Tower 
New York City 



t*rfawi6cenU 



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CITY C 

AN 

Why ^efi^piventy 



X- J x ■ : ■ ■ 




Expelled? 




i-JJP Price 3c. 



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THE BEGINNINGS 



of 



WAR RESimNCE 



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i,Ph.D. \&^l 



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Jessie Wallace Hughan, 



"**, 



Author oi 

What is Socialism? 

A Study of International Government 

The Challenge of Mars and Other Verses 






^^ 



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WAR RESISTERS LEAGUE 

171 WEST 12th STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 



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Five Cents 



12 for 35 Cents 



,309 



100 for $2.00 



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!41 



,A WAIV lg 



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A SUPPLEMENT TO THE BEGINNINGS OF WAR RESISTANCE 



Much water has flowed under the bridge 
since January, 1937, and the water has been 
muddy and turbulent. 

The unprecedented policies of aggression 
pursued by the dictator governments have 
brought about a revival of the World War 
slogan, "Make the World Safe for Democracy." 
After the breakdown of the League of Nations 
and the tragedy of Munich, the cry was for 
collective security, raised once more by the 
same groups who pinned their faith to the 
Covenant of 1919. The terrifying events of 
1940 have carried our own country to the verge 
of a war hysteria of which conscription is the 
first indication. The distinction is again clearly 
drawn between the liberal peace advocates, who 
trust in governments and stand ready to sup- 
port a "justifiable" war, and the pacifists, who 
oppose all war without exception. 

The Communist "New Line" 

On the other hand, striking transformations 
have come about in the attitude of Communist 
anti-militarists, in consequence of the various 
changes in policy of the Third International 
(Comintern). 

The "new Communist line" authorized by 
Moscow in 1935 not only included cooperation 
for collective security with so-called democratic 
governments, but prescribed support of these 
governments by Communists everywhere, with 
a shift of emphasis from revolutionary agitation 
to political liberalism. Accordingly the Amer- 
ican Communist Party lost no time in allying 
itself with the Democrats and the "New Deal" 
and vigorously supporting Roosevelt's demands 
for rearmament against Nazi aggression. 

In harmony with this change in Communist 
policy, the American League Against War and 
Fascism, under the new name of American 
League for Peace and Democracy, never def- 
initely pacifist, departed even farther from the 
policies of war resistance than had been in- 
dicated by its original position. While it never 
literally endorsed conscription or the participa- 
tion of our country in foreign wars, it took a 
definite stand for collective security and for 
defensive war in Spain and China, urged the 
adoption of sanctions against the aggressor and 
refrained from opposing either the excessive 
rearmament program or the proposed fortifica- 
tion of Guam/ 

A 



The Newer Communist Line 

In August, 1939. however, Soviet Russia*" 
joined hands with Hitler and proceeded \ 
the invasion, first of Poland, and later of Fin- 
land. As Russia thus took its place as an 
aggressor nation allied with Fascism, the pol- 
icies of collective security and American re- 
armament were now directed against the Soviet 
Republic rather than in its defense. Immedi- 
ately, therefore, the Communist Party re- 
nounced its support of Roosevelt's war prepar- 
ations and adopted a platform of "Keeping 
America Out of War". 

Early in 1940, the American League for 
Peace and Democracy, whose close connection 
with Communism had been publicised by the 
Dies Committee, suddenly dissolved its organ- 
ization, not without suggestions of a possible 
rebirth under a new name. 

The Newest Communist Line 

With the unexpectedly rapid advance of 
Hitler and the crushing of France, Russia's 
policy changed toward a form of "neutrality" 
with some cooling off toward Germany. Ay 
cordingly, the American Communists in Jun^\ 
1940, began once again to use anti-Hitler phrase- 
ology, while continuing its policy of opposition 
to the National Defense Program and to Amer- 
ican participation in the war. In this connec- 
tion, it was the leading spirit of the American 
Peace Mobilization in Chicago in September. 

Youth 

The youth movement against militarism could 
not have failed to be seriously affected by these 
changes in Communist policy, as the American 
Student Union, the moving force in the student 
strikes against war, is largely under the lead- 
ership of Communist sympathizers. As the 
movement gradually changed its emphasis from 
agitation against war to advocacy of collective 
security against the aggressor nations, a breach 
naturally developed between the Communists 
and League of Nations supporters on the one 
hand, and the opponents of collective security 
on the other. The difference came to a head 
at the World Youth Congress in 1938. TTie Youth 
Committee Against War, founded earlier in 
that year, became the youth section of the 
Keep America Out of War Congress and since 







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Cgnf identi 

Not for public 
until Feb. 1, 1 
or previous not 
the /War Resigtjjrs. 
League, lfTw. 12 St. 
H.Y.C. 




Mars and his Al iases 




by Jessie Wal la e«/ffugh an, Ph.D 
... / . 

Recently I attended a meeting called by a Peace Oub of 
college students. It began with long resolutions 

a ^ i] ?. 3 ^ War and endecl ln enthusiastic applause for war,- 
and this with no realization of a change" of fronFT Mars 
had disguised himself; that wa3 all. 

Have you seen "Amphitryon 38", the Lunts' new play? It 
tells again the old story of how Jupiter, having easily 
won over such a simple soul as Leda by metamorphosing 
himself into a swan, was forced to a subtler device for 
the conquest of the faithful wife Alcmena, and there- 
after took on the form of her own beloved husband Amphi- 
tryon. 

Mars, the twentieth century divinity, is no less Macchiav- 
ellian. When the ancient trapping of military glory 
and even national honor proved too crude for us "moderns, 
he adopted new forms of camouflage. In 1914-1918 he 
scored such a big success in the roles of anti- (German) - 
militarist, protector of weak nations and defender of 
democracy that he is appearing again to wildly applauding 
audiences, with only such changes of costume as are need- 
ed to fit the fashions of 1937. 

These revived roles are particularly effective. Largely 
as a result of the successes of twenty years ago, German 
militarism is more terrifying than ever, weak nations are 
now being invaded in direct defiance of the world, and 
democracy i3 openly menaced by frank and aggressive dic- 
tatorships, With a few changes in proper names,- Hitler 
for the Kaiser, Spain and China for Belgium, Fascism for 
absolute monarchy,- and with democracy, (a bit frazzled 
to be sure) still in the role of distressed heroine, the 
pley goes merrily on, before wo are well through paying 
the bills for the last performance. 

What- I mean in plain word: i3 this. Belgium would now 
be safer from German militarism if the United States had 
never become a belligerent, and if the World War had. end- 



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K-JX 1965 
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Hotel de Russie, Geneva, 
April 5, 1938. 



COMMUNICATION 

from the 
WOMEN'S CONSULTATIVE COMMITTEE 



To the League of Nations Committee of Experts on the Status of Women :- 

The following women's international organisations, although 
having widely different programmes of work, are united in supporting 
equality of right3 between mc-n and women and therefors unite in pre- 
senting the following communication to the Committee of Experts on the 
Status of Women:- 

Great encouragement has been given to women by the plan of the 
League of Nations for consideration of the status of women throyghout the 
world. We feel that the bringing of this question before the League of 
Nations is an important step in the history of women's emancipation. 

Thcj examination of the status of women all over the world is 
awaited by women with the greatest impatience and interest. Never was it 
more necessary for the nations to get together to discuss how the position 
of women might be improved. It is a subject involving conflicting legal 
systems and multifarious tribal and customary practices within and without 
the law, and is, thus, not an abstract question but one of practical im- 
portance . 

Forces of reaction are at work in many parts of the world res- 
tricting and denying to women liberties and independence hardly won - in 
particular the one essential of independence, the right to engage in 
remunerative occupations. Far and wide the right to paid employment is 
being attacked by legislative restrictions applying only to women, When 
the women who have been in the forefront are losing ground in this way, 
it is doubly difficult to raise the status of those who are so backward 
as to be verging upon a state of slavery. 

There is in the documents of the League ample information re- 
garding woman's franchise position in tha various countries. We ask your 
Committee to examine this material and to vote a recommendation that 
equality of voting rights for men and women be made a condition for member- 
ship in the League of Nations as proposed in the document which was brought 
before the last Assembly at the instance of 15 Delegations, reading : 

"The Members of thn League undertake that in their respective 
countries the right to vote shall not be denied or abridged 
on the ground of sex", (see League document A.8 .1937 .V . ) . 

We call to your attention also the other equality proposals 
which ware brought before the last Assembly at the request of the same ]_5 
Delegations, and we ask your Committee to recommend favorable action upon 
them, (see League document A.8 . 1937 ,V .) . 

Vse also ask your Committee to base, upon the data about to be 
collated, a recommendation that the Assembly present to all States of 
World the Treaty guaranteeing equal rights for men and women signed by 4 



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THAT WE 



MIGHT LIVE 



By, 

MERLE//EYLES 




~\WAR RESISTERS' INTERNATIONAL 
| 11 ABBEY ROAD, ENFIELD, MIDDX. 
ENGLAND 



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CALL FOR UNITED PACIFIST CONFERENCE 

March 29-30, 1941 

AT LABOR TEMPLE 

Fourteenth Street and Second Avenue, New York %-n 7 

THE call for the United Pacifist Conference held in February 194tUiaid\ 
"If the war in Europe and Asia is not stopped in the next few wieks, it is 
likely to spread and be intensified — with results that stagger the imaginatic 
In our own country plans are being made for .1 presidential election that may 
be as fateful as that of 1916." All the world knows now ho>~tfe«-*rh!zkrieg 
in Norway, Holland, Belgium, France and other tragic events proved how 
well founded was our foreboding a year ago. In last fall's election both can- 
didates proclaimed that they were opposed to involvement of this country in 
actual warfare. True to the pattern of 1916-1917, however, President Roose- 
velt opened his third term with an address in which he gave the green light 
to the Churchill cabinet for an all-out war against Germany, in which the 
United States would become the "arsenal of democracy" and which would not 
end until the United States and Great Britain were in a position to dictate 
the terms of peace. The phrase "short of war" is now ominously omitted 
from the President's references to aid to Britain. If 1940 was America's 1916, 
the year 1941 may become its 1917! 

Thus the pacifist movement, which has again made notable gains in mem- 
bership and activity during the past year, is also confronted with a much 
vaster task and a more momentous challenge. How may we even now more 
effectively show the masses of people in this nation that they are being lured 
or driven into the war which they dread? How may we tackle in a statesman- 
like fashion and with the utmost possible unity the problems which confront 
conscientious objectors and pacifists generally under the conscription act? How 
can we stop the movement to fasten permanent universal compulsory service 
on this nation? How discharge our responsibilities to the C.O.'s who are in 
jail today for conscience' sake and to other men and their families who will 
be made to suffer for their pacifism? How can we make our American pacifist 
movement, like Gandhi's movement in India, a genuine mass movement to 
achieve basic social changes and build a new world in the spirit and by the 
method of non-violence? 

The groups which sponsored the United Pacifist Conferences in 193 8, 1939, 
1940, know the profound concern felt by pacifists about these and related 
problems and therefore arranged for a Conference this year. Plans for the 
mobilization on Washington for the same week-end caused us to postpone our ( 
Washington's Birthday Conference to the week-end of Saturday afternoon, 
March 29th, through Sunday evening, March 30th, 1941. 

K V UNITED PACIFIST COMMITTEE 

A. J. MUSTE^ Chairman ABRAHAM KAUFMAN, Secretary 

The organizations participating in the work of the United Pacifist Com- 
mittee include: 

Fellowship of Reconciliation Secretary of Peace League 

New History Society War Resisters League 

Pax (A Group of Catholic Conscien- \v/ omen > s International League for 

tious Objectors) ^ ^ ^^ y Sme) 
Religious Society of Friends, Peace 

Committee Women's Peace Union 



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, to be addressed by the great teactf3r o .and u 
3r , i National Committee of the Far ResiiteW Sec 

iorge W. Hartmann, Professor cf Social Psychologize. 
jllege of Columbia University. Dr. Hartmann'a topics: 




eachers- 



May 11, 1942 

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Dear Friend: 

We are sure that you will be interest ed^tg^^ng? 
our open meeting next week, Sunday evening, Hay 
Friends House 
member of the 
George 7. r ■ Hsviii 

Colliga of Columbia University. Dr. Hartmann'a .opia-^of special 
interest, wa feel, to all pacifists and liberals at tne present 
time. 

During war, pacifism as a method of life, is open to a 
most critical examination by non-pacifists as to its meaning, 
spirit, purpose and practicability. And during war, Pacifism is 
subjected to careful scrutiny even by those who no Id it as a 
belief. 

Processor Hartmann'a topic - "Interpreting Pacifism to 
Wnn-Pacifists'in Wartime" - deals with problems that many have 
f°oSnd "perpraxing. Its purpose is to say the things thai : explain 
to the non-pacifists in today's world the actions and beliefs of 

the pacifists. 



Whether you are a pacifist or not, we hope you 
come to this meeting, and bring your friends. Certainly 
true that understanding and enlightenment are the key 



to 



will 

it is 

many of 



the present problems of the peoples of the "world. We invite you 
to join us in beginning the task of spreading some measure oi this 
understanding and enlightenment by means oi this meeting. 



May we repeat the details: 1 



// ii n it ii >■ •• ii it II il '111 nil II OJ1JJ a U 'I " "• 'Ul JUUl -UJ-l -1UUUIM J1J11L11JUUUULUM 

U 'i PROFESSOR 



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GEORGE W. HARTMANN 
of Columbia University 

"Interpreting Pacifism to. Uon-Pacifists 

in Wartime 1 ' 



Friends Meeting Hou3e 



At the 
Meeting 
2111 Florida Avenue, II. W 

On Sunday, Hay 17, at 3:00 P.M. Sharp. 

All Invited 



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Very truly yours, 

[■INUATI0H3 COMMITTES 



— m ARE REVISING OUR MAILING LIST K/'M i h IS j 

It El? l\ ah J° : eceive future issues " ^ " 

of the "Vashmgt on Pacifist" and — 

our other regular mailings will you Dct«"ig4Jr" - 

please indicate your interest by 1 , JT ~ J I ■ ' b-" 

fillmg out and returning this card. ^ R) W 

j - *-- 1 * . . . . i .^ ' f £ '"' :esi '- 1 u '- r ^ Lc - ; iic 

ADDRESS __ j£ - ^O^f® 

Washington Area War Resisters 'League [l*!? J^^^bout;.¥h- ;- 

s -a ^e doctrTne-of~'the ?ou"»< 

_____ 3 arise out of © victo^-.- f ■.•- 
end war of those fo, who, ^ l^^^ ^^^^ ^g; - 

can b?oh?ainel S b y C ra ^s tfltr^l^T t^l^ 1 ^ in themselve 
better way? It is our ^posTto shL^^hfSn. ** WOrld * 

Freedoms, to be siven on , l c • lec _ UIes on P&cifism and the Four 
feting House, 2lir?lo?idAvenup e u^ Sf enin ^ at the Friends 
of varied aifl'tetweiS^'baSSSSSSaJ: "' The Spe " kers are **<**** 

Kev. A. J. I.IUSTE, our first <?np a i<- 

er, will discuss Freedom of Ref? mem S er of the National Committee 

gion on October 18th. ? n Con s c ^entious Objectors of the 

American Civil Liberties Union and 

Ordained to the ministry in 1909 Sf+H!« f^tive Commi ttec of the 

Vje resigned under pressure from ' Jajional Religion aid Labor Foun- 
the Central Congregational rw,* datlon - He was one of the organ- 

of Newtonville^fs.* Srin?S£ *F* °V hfc Jewish P ^ c * Vellowl 

first World War, refusiSt? g keen ^J?" He has been Student Coun- 

silent about his relirfofs Saei ?^ ll0r at Co1 ™^ University for 

fist convictions. He has been the prst ei S ht V^.rs. 
prominent in the leadership? 

many labor campaigns and strikes iP RR P IIILGRAiJ > who will speak on 
He was General Secretary of the £ re e£om irom Tyranny November lot- 
Amalgamated Textile Workers of A *f been active *n the youth and 
merica from 1919 to 1921, and Di J abor m ° T ' rfcn3Cnts since his colic 
rector of Brookwood Labor College 2 a ¥?' He was ex P c Hcd from the ' 
1921-33. college College of the City of New Yorv 

One of the outstanding leaders of ? S ? rin ?" leader of a student c ,- 

the Trotskyist section of thl r™ J es t against an official reception 

munist movement in the Snitel , t0 ^fJ^ ? ascists ** 1935. E 

States, he resigned in 1936 unon ? S ^iledinJersey City in in , 

. again becoming convinced of the ^distributing trade union i_ ,.. 

self-defeating charaotpr n-r +-hl £ « . 

resort to violence" lavin? Je! ??! ^ ional Secretary of the *.:,- 

turned to a thoro relSiouf Sari Sfl ^^ LtG ^ e » iIr - Ingram 

fist position, he ilnfw Director d J rected the national C ^P^ Id 

of the Presbyterian Labor Tenn?p the X ^ cent 0de11 ^ller case, end 

Hew York City, and SecreLJv of ' + ° rganized the suc cessful effort 

the Fellowship of Reconciliation 1° fT ^ h ' nche11 ^ Woodhrorth, and 

v reconciliation. Brown, seamen victims of a Hague 

V^-bbi ISIDORE B. HOFFMAN will talk K^^L" He **" clso Ci member^of 

on Freedom from Want on October the National Executive Committee 

25th. Rabbi Hoffman was a ^ractete ° +? G Socialist Party and has -, 

student in the American School^? S ent i y ^ c ^ted membership on th 

Orion+,1 t> eT . ^ U . °PA 001 0t Board Of rri-rm+^a „*> i»tv r»^^„. 



Laurence Housman, Chairman 

H. Runham Brown, 

Honorary Secretary 



Affiliated with the . -* % Q \\ Abbey Road, Enfield 

WAR RESISTERS' INTERNATIONAL 



Middlesex, England 



The^WAR RESISTERS 






jvnk Olmstead, Field Work Director 
Frances Rose Ransom, Membership Secretary 



Room 414 * 2 Stone Street 
NEW YORK 4, N. Y. 





LEAGUE > 18 iq 

Address General Communications to: 

Jessie Wallace Hughan, Secretary or 

Abraham Kaufman £,.—-..»;-.- c. .„i tr y 



Dear Companion on the way to Freedom, 



It is near midnight as I write this in my 34th Street room, and 
not many minutes ago, Evan Thomas, Bob Brooks, Abe Kaufman and I 
were having a snack at a 42nd Street Childs Restaurant, discussing 
the W.R.L. Evan said that he thought the most important service 
we are giving right now is helping individual CO's who are in 
trouble. They certainly flock to us, partly because we are ac- 
cessible, being open evenings and all day Saturday, and partly 
because we try to be constantly set for such service. 

We recognized, as we talked on, that we can be doing all that 
fine service and yet be failing. This is a period that demands 
from us the utmost in courageous thinking and action. The other 
night, Evan, Bob and I sat up into the wee small hours trying to 
re-define our W.R.L. purposes and function. The cost of progress 
involves many such sessions for many of us. 

We believe that the fallacies of the war method show up more 
clearly as we approach the end of this dreadful convulsion. It 
is apparent that freedom to know the human race as a family is 
the heart of progress and that war, starting as a means to keep 
limits on such freedom, becomes itself the chief foe of freedom. 
Similarly we see conscription as inseparable from total war, an 
indispensible aid to totalitarianism with which we can do busi- 
ness only with tragic consequences to ourselves and our cause. 

We feel that 1944 is due to be the greatest year in W.R.L. his- 
tory. We should have more new members, more contributions, more 
significant literature, and a more vigorous and fearless cam- 
paign against war and all of its manifestations. 

The first step to this end involves us all. We must straightway 
provide the $1,400. of new gifts to finish the year without debt 
and we must resolve now to increase our W.R.L. budget for 1944. 






Will you get a check to us before Armistice Day, November 11th? 
This is true giving, since it does not reduce our taxes. Almost 
I am glad that it is not made easy. Such giving is a prayer that 
comes from our hearts and links with the Heart of the Universe. 



October 21, 1943 

Evan W, Thomas, Chairman 



Yours for^ new fjne_edom, 



1 



^%^—0\ 



1RGE VV. HaRTMANN 
1N HOWLAND LaTHROP 
R1EDA L. LaZASL'S 

V ice'Chairmen 



Harbison DeSilvep. 
Treasurer 



Assistant Treasurer 
Evelyn West HlghaN 



Charlotte Bent_ey 
R. Boland Brooks 
Allan K. Chalmers 
?.t.\ Corpma.n 
Winston Dancxs 



Executive Committee 
John" H. Denton 
Sue Flanagan 
Nathalie B. Manning 
Lillian D. Mosesco 
A. j. Mgsti 



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Orlib A. H. Pell 
Bayaiid Rustin 
J. Holmes Smith 
Jay Nelson TfCK 
Fhancsh Witherspoon 



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»■«•£- ^iijlfc'^^-w-**-^ * 



X-JX 1965 






•-.--■-. -.. -? , 



S^™J-£sL. E&1GU E FOR PEACE AIjD FREEDOM 



• v ' : ■•■■• rc-s 3 or the W.I.L. 



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' *^"2*G, 4 - 5 August 1946 



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....^.': / L b " Jov - Oen,,ress of the Roman's Int ernotiona] 

"'-'" ' J ■ -' ' "•'" ' -■'■- f^eUdOH. T 3'USt f>/inff "■' I- 1 n.iwit -v +n • ■ • 

■• ■--, - finest ten years, years of inexpressible 

' l™ ' : > •■• r - 1 ''-'• ™e of us, ■ nd st least 

i-l, 1 .i.. el ];':. 5/ ;■;,--[; v , c0 , . ..,-; ... ,... , ,,. 

. ,L -'" 1 ' : -- ■ ' . of our common cause. phot w 3 are able 

* ' ' i:i ;! - ; - ! -V fateful. J want to than] 



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^s, the £rund Duchy of Lu-ie.&bur£' 



first of 

- 5 



"'V ' : ;: - ! - - '■'■'<'■ '' thrown open it: doors to us~iri 
l; . : .'' nct u - ed "<■'' in the past, ,Vo ,;orv, not mer<!v 

f - Uj - -■'-■-'-■£ t.. j p-y -ho government of this oonntw 



i.'untry 
olp in every detail. 



r ' ; r 't'ici.j.<:rj.y btod to Madame Clement :.ipl her whole 



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U'C 

0o ~ v; r,ors [ "°' r ' t - tl0i ^ ^il-port which in its efficiency 
■-' ' • '; " - ; L L -' J '"' '■' , - buy end praise ;md invaluable to us. 
L '" '- v! '- ! Ut ; 1: - ''^-- ^re os neitbur liOuiariie clement nor Vie 
: - °- l "■'''■■ organising committee ore co-workers nr, tbe 
0i - ; ' tIl ° v-rord, i.e. members f th W.t.t P v 

•'-- ".. ' • '- ■ ' ■-'" Ol:i.i,:; .lros ■'-it "IVi" iii^nn^--i1 -- i .- -, -■-',- i 



.Lj' ; 



ir and who therefc for peace. 



OXJl 3n ill ( ., 1 ; 1 

; f vl C ' l ' ;;, ' :V , lV -o' ■^••voor, araong other I. io, 0, to state 
,^ btjlia or^fm: b.tgiou alr.10 at so clearly and ao'or :vincin^lv 
i; - ;V,; ' JUr : ''V Lj -' l ' l; - ;i: - t " !1 ' ■-'"■-■--:. '-■ their involu, 1, sid in°orepa- 
- •--; Congress, vvill -oit no join the v/onen's Peace t;ot1 - 3 .", t 
3COJ ■•■■ j : ' '- ^ t t lo V/.I.L.P.F. 
, ""•■■■ ; ■■'-. x '- : -- i; '- ; Vly 'tratsfnl to knov; at loir last the tor^ibl^ 

.,.' , " L - u - u l - Julj[UCl, - ! - ,J - i .i^avo lx:oi urou^ht to a 

'"/;' "''"'■' - : ua - v , ' ; ^ 1 r]? -'- from the nightmare of ovorr^oro 1 ■-- ■■_ 
';-'-/ .■ : - v - ;:: ' ! io.-?.vo r vrd distress sweeping over oeoel.. s ■ jc] 

,"' ; ■ ' ' l l : ' '- lJJ ply :-r-rteful, LioreoTer, for the pjio, ■ ■.' 
b ;; >;: - 7t3,,trs, L;_hat, however far e.-pfcrt ?;e --ore 
, : ..;; ' " : ' : " '.;■■■''■'-'' r - - ; - ■-■' 3thor in thought. ; r e did not olways 

;';p ■ -":■'■ ' ; - ! ; —^j ■•'-' social and reli ;ious ufciooh. our 
-"■'^■■ co - : - - ^/-Lotions v/ore apt to clhsh; we did not -.■--■: 1 
;- ~ ■ ' -:" - lr ■ "•"'' ■'■-': od.- 01 • ork and ro; ■■ •-; 1 nor ■ ■- ^ 
J 1 ; 31 --',' 1 ' - V! . on uatters in tno future, ut ii r :: : p- '. " -:■- 

p- -••, ^ ■ I; cotter 00 t deeply, is our Cipht r r 

'■' " ^■fc'^ion 3.! hi m ■ r 1 d/ions, ■ ; twe, 11 .. livi-j is, l >f 
■ ! ' ■ ■ • ■ -■ 0..1 'P.;; 1 eopi. es ->;,' this jrld, r 1 av 
-■ ■ ' - tj LI are : , s1; n - rt . " . hi i 
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i.iSG : , 3 i ;t O'.'l . 



X-JX 19b5 

WOMEN'S INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE FOR PEACE AND FREEDOM 



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REPORT TO TENTH INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF THE WILPF 
Meeting at Luxembourg. August 4-9,1946, 
BY THE CHAIRMAN OF TEE COMMITTEE ON THE AMERICAS 
(abridged version) 

Although partial reports have been sent at regular intervals 
to the international officers, this is the first comprehensive report 
to be made since 1937, hence it covers 9 years of activity. 

To begin with, it is well to review just what the "Committee 
on the Americas" is. Formerly called the "Inter-American Committee", 
the name was changed in 1938 to avoid confusion with the official 
"Inter-American Commission of Women" s This Committee, responsible to 
the international Co-chairman, was intended to have one representative 
in each country of Air-erica, who would apread a knowledge of WILPF 
principles and endeavor to form a National Section, The expense of 
this work has always been carried by the U.S, Section, usually about 
$ 125 a year. 

Besides its long-range objective, the Committee tries to help 
all the Latin American woman it can reach to solve their own political 
and social problems and those of the Western Hemisphere, It also tries 
to secure more participation by the Latin American nations in the 
settling of current inter-American questions. 

Let us now review some of the specific work that has been done 
on these problems. In several cases where there were boundary disputes 
in an acute or dangerous stage, your chairman has written to or talked 
with women from both countries concerned, urging them to work against 
inflamed public sentiment and for a calm consideration of issues 
involved * She has also asked other members of the Committee and 
organizations of Latin American women to do the same, and frequently 
urged the U-S. Department of State to use its good offices. This was 
done in connection with relations between Bolivia and Paraguay, 
Colombia and Venezuela, Haiti and the Dominican Republic, Honduras and 
Nicaragua, and notably in the case of the Ecuador- Peru boundary 
dispute, which called for many consultations and representations 
before government officials. 

A continuous struggle has been waged by your chairman, 
especially in her capacity as Coordinator of Inter- American Work for 
the U.S, Section, to eradicate the imperialist phases of U.S, policy 
and make the Good Neighbor Policy a reality In 1937 we urged a new 
attitude toward Cuba, which would give her a free hand in working out 
her own destiny. Relations with Mexico have demanded almost continuous 
attention, including such matters as a fair attitude toward the Mexican 
expropriation of Petroleum and agricultural properties belonging to 
American investors; the settlement of an old dispute concerning a small 
area bordering on the State of Texas; and not least of all, the defense 
of the rights of Mexican laborers who have come to the United States „ 



have also defended the rights of Negro workers who were being 
discriminated against in work on the construction of U.S, army and navy 
bases in the Caribbean islands. In 1943 we held a conference, in 
New York City, on Economic and Social Problems in the Caribbean, 



X-JX1965* x-JX 19b5 






ftmxy H-TEEH-ATICGy^L LEAGUE FOR PEACE jffilD FREEDOM 






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^01,iJl^3^2iE^ i - 1 ^ ' 



L° *J_; ^•^.•sentativos of the twenty one Government a 
"^•■oiaDiod at the Peace Conference in Paris, August 1946. 



sittlemen: - 



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.;... , /f> 2cc v/caaon or some twenty countries ■•••nthored 

":.:e?of ^! r- ^ W ? 0fla,a Int0 ^ti°nal League for Peace and 
;;:';'!: n a n0;i ' ^"^g -^ Luxembourg voice the ardent lon/dng for 

. '.'■ u ; OVe3 T ra& i. and woman ln the world and solemnly make oar 
a '" J '-' ' J you a3 ' i:il ° bearers of a heavy responsibility. 

t 1 ' i3 '■ iii -- Ereat anxiety that we see orolon-'od the 
.."''.:,"' ° x , !1 : re i, oau - i ''-i by the unhappy delays in reaching 
agj. orient in tne peace treaties. 

0T1 tv rn , nn ^° U p fi f: ;t a PP oal to you is to base those treaties 
?*?* ■ , t! - ptiGt f01 ' thG ^lenity of the human personality and on 
: l ;;':^', xl; '- 1 -." ~ . a rospact not conceived in the spirit of atomistic 
p IU --;^ua.usm uu»; as an essential element in the new socially 
organized community, 

A Charter f human Rights should bo an integral 
overy peace treaty, and each of the States concerned should 
bo , f .wu,: L ,ed .0 incorporate this in its constitution. 

, . , After our twentyfive years 1 exoerioncu of the ev" 1 s 

Cn'ti ?'f!i U, 'i G r oatlOG wnlch ignored the economic consequences of 

.;v; ;^: il lie ! c ,- L3 i OIls ^ °- : ' ton drawing frontier lines without any regard 

:; \-™f\ / 3 ;- 10 ct .. on eveI y <*ay social and economic life, we appeal 

.;" J ?? aut ' ,; ° '- llj - ow national interests, economic advantage and 

;• f^'S iJ " a 3torraine the decisions of the Conference, but to act 

■-■■> L-riioLees 01 the human race as one unit. 

_^ _ ,,. , Til ° VTOI> ld is sick with longing for an atmosphere 
01 confidence end security. 

.,+ ,.„„ .,,.. . Zt f; lr ' 2 sur bauds, gentlemen, to tabs decisive 
rfor^n"^ oroating a world free from four and free 
xrom want- a world in which every human being, however humble, 
<'herovor placed, feels secure, politically free, socially' safe, 
".," S o:n -; : ' 01 , l » economically, to plan his or nor life ahead and in 



hi-.. 



' J '"'" : GJ: ^duc-ioion enjoying full, and equal opportunities. 



L 



, . 0nl ^' if conceived with this highest ourpose in rolnr 
'::"; C/1 ~ ^^tfcios now bein,-< concluded safeguard :. .nistand durable 

• ' ace . 

1 ' on:! nar ^ ^f the 10th Congress . the >] n's 



Yours faitb.fuili 5 
■ly ":. : loh 
Internatir .al ... • ry Pr, . [ ni 

Clara Ra : - v, 



' ' • 



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WOMM^S INTERNATIOITAI LEAGUE FOR PEACE AND FREEDOM 

^gjnQgi^gS IPESTS* REPORT 

International Executive Committee 
Geneva, July 8-13,1948 



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Dear friends, 

o^ a - n + ? er9 „ we meet x a gain, the members of the Executive Committee 
after 14 months of separation, We are happy to meet again and to be 
able to confer upon the work we have in common. Your vice-presidents 
are even happier than the other members of the Executive, because - 
even though we think we have not done enough - we have felt our 
responsibility as a burden during this long time between the two 
conferences. We feel too that we are handicapped by the long distances 
and by having to correspond to get at every decision. In the fi-st 
plaoe we ask you to forgive that we have not been able to cope with 
everything we ought to have undertaken, -he league ought to have taken 
tot* ^W other questions than we have The vice-presidents dor ; t 

have so much time to spare for the league because of the increasing ' 
responsibilities within our professions, e 

*<~ + J! Q are sorry to sa ^ that 30me of our members are not here 
first we mention Miss Balch, who had to leave Europe after her visit 
to Scandinavia Germany and Great Britain. Miss Madeleine Rolland is 
still hindered by the accident she had* Mrs.Mildred Slmsted and Dr Bussev 
have sent their regrets not being able to join us, -^ussey 

Here comes the message from Miss Balch; 

«-p +v, o J h ? a ^ lvit y of thQ ^a.gue has been rather good and one 
Baor for th thin gs is *h& reports with UNO. We thank Gertrude 

,, ^ v Gertrude Bae ^. who is our liaison officer at UNO., has 
succeeded by her contacts and many demarches to obtain Consultative 
Status with UNO for our league at the 5th of March 1948, At this 

2JE5 "Sh? ^L Exe °? tive mGetin S WQ wish to thank her for what she has 
done. This Friday she is going to talk about the outstandirg work she 
has done in UNO before the above mentioned date and afterwards! Her 
Circular letters and. ether documents we have already obtained and thev 
have proved on us the important work that is done at lake Success, The 
other non-gouvern.iental organizations even have reproached us for being 
disloyal because she has intervened too often. ' 

o 4.4 u v The work of the Political Committee within the American 
Section has been very efficient. Especially it had studied the set-up 
°S IS? ^ a f, sha1 } ? lan in Europe, Our League has had the opportunity 
)f officially giving advice and of discussing this natter, 

for which 
are. responsible "^ glVQ a list ° f the action sAhe Vice-Presidents 



^ 



( 1965 






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LIGUE INTERNATIONALE DE FEMMES POUR LA PAIX ET LA LIBERTE 

Comite Executif International, Geneve juillet 19^8 

LA FEDERATION EUROPEENNE. PREMIERE ETAPE VERS 
UNE FEDERATION MONDIALE 
(Rapport d c Andree Jouve) 

Je dis Federation et non Union, je dis Federation europeenne et 
non occidentale - ces nuances, comme vous le verrez, ont leur 
importance. Avant tout les Fdderalistes veulent rassembler 1'Europe 
entiere - et m£me plus que 1' Eur ope «• lis refusent d 1 accepter la 
division du monde - et de 1' Europe » en deux blocs hos tiles, 

Realite proche 

1. lis partent de r halites tout a fait proches, Entre deux^tres' 
grandes puissances qui semblaient gagner du terrain a ses^depens, la 
vieille Europe ruinee par la guerre, pietinee, ecrasee, reduite par 
une pressionqui s'wxerce de 1'Est et de 1' Quest, cherche le moyen de 
revivre et d'arr£ter par sa presence et sa resistance un terrible 
conflit qui se denouerait sur son sol et dont elle serait victime, 
Le danger est si evident que m£me les gouvernements'voient qu'ils sont 
obliges de sacrifier a cette idee. C'est un fait qu'ils commencent 
deja a renoncer a une part de leur souverainete: des tentatives comme 
celles des 16 ou des 5> si imparfaites, si partielles soient-elles 
sont des commencements 6 L' Europe est en train de se faire. Sidles 
peuples ne~poussent pas les gouvernements dans le sens du federalisme, 
l*Europe s' unifier a sans les federalistes et nous verrons que ce 
n'est pas sans danger 

Historique 

2» Ce h'est pas une idee nouvelle. II y a eu dans le passe plusieurs 
tentatives pour unifier - sinon federaliser - 1' Europe, et il faut 
se le rappeler pour condamner certaines formes d 'unification. 

II y a d'abord a travers l'histoire, 

a) les puissances qui tendent~a unifier l f Europe sous la domination 
d'un Etat, d-un conquerant, d'une race, c'est la tentative absolutistes 
1'Empire Romain, Napoleon I, les pangermanistes avec Guillaume II et 
Hitler ont nettement vise ce but lis ont echoue* Mais dans nos temps 
modernes , nous pouvons craindre une domination economique egalement 
conquerante: 1' expansion americaine. 

b) les puissances religieuses ou ideologiques ont aussi tente de 
conquer ir 1' Europe, de lui imposer un credo sous leur domination. 
C'est le cas de l'Eglise catholique au Moyen Age qui voulait unir 
toute la chretiente", Elle a echoue, puis qu' elle s'est divis^e en 
trois groupes et s'est heurtee a la naissance des nations. C'est 
encore le cas de la conque*te arabe du VII erne siecle qui aurait fait de 
1' Europe un Etat musulman si elle avait reus si, Enfin la Revolution 
francaise, avec le m£me esprit de propagande. a voulu imposer par les 
armes son ideologies les droits de l'homme et la liberte Actuellement 
1' ideologic communis te, sous sa forme sovietique, tend elle aussi non 
seulement a se repandre mais a s' imposer dans toute 1'Europe,- et au 
dsla, dans le monde africain et asiatique. Les ideologies ne peuvent 



LI. 1 -9 



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WOMEN'S INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE FOR PEACE AND FREEDOM 

International Executive Committee 
Geneva July !9-f8 

INTERIM REPORT TO INTERNATIONAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF WILPF 
by Chairman of Committee on the Americas 
(Heloise Brainerd, USA) 

During the two years since the International Congress at Luxembourg, 
your Chairman has spent most of her time on the Inter-American Congress 
of Women, held at Guatemala City in August, l9*+7<> Although this was a 
project of the US Section, you will be interested to know that, in spite 
of ma:o.7 obstacles, it did take place and was epoch-making in certain 
respects o It was the first time that such a congress had been held in the 
Americas, on a completely democratic basis, as every known association of 
women in the .hemisphere was invitedo There were present a total of 68 
delegates, from 18 countries, representing some 80 organizations Through 
the efforts of the US Section of the WILPF, about j3 3,800 were raised 
for Congress expenses, in addition to some collected by the Guatemalan 
Committee, 

One of the Congress resolutions created a Federation of Women of the 
Americas a The Secretariat of three (Annalee Stewart, Carmen de Lozada 
of Bolivia, and myself) is making some progress in getting tS's Feder- 
ation on its feet, and hopes it may be possible to hold another such 
congress in l9*+9 or 19^0. 

During the last year a Spanish leaflet describing the WILPF has been 
revised and reprinted, and a Spanish membership blank printed,, These 
two cost the US Section S 117 I the Section also contributes about $ 1^0 
a year to the regular inter-American work 

At the prejent time, there are 13 Latin American Associate Members, 
paying # 5 a year each, and one National Section (Brazil) A section is 
in ptocess of formation in Chile, and preliminary work has been done in 
Puerto Rico Nominal groups or committees exist in five countries 
(Costa Rica, Cuba. Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua) As a result of propaganda 
against our women's congress, the Guatemalan group closed up. 

The Committee on the Americas was reorganized, as authorized by the 
Luxembourg Congress* It now consists of nine members, six of whom are 
Latin Americans and three from the United States (List appended) A 
woman from El Salvador ,Sra de Wolter, was added in 19^7, with the 
approval of the two co-chairmen, and Dr Justo of Argentina was recently 
invited to serve, but has not been heard from, due no doubt to conditions 
in Argentina » 

now propose Mme Madeleine Sylvain Bouchereau of Haiti, who has long 
een interested in the WILPF and has carried on s.-iuilar work in Haiti, 
besides making a notable contribution in rural education,, In 19^5 she 
was in Europe for several months, with the UNRRAo 



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WOMEN'S INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE FOR PEACE AND FREEDOM 

International Executive Committee 
Geneva July 19^-8 

■ PALESTINE 
(Dorothy C.M.Warner, .Gt. Britain) 

I take it that the object of the introductory speaker to our dis- 
cussions is not to set up a rigid framework of opinions or historical 
events, not to suggest any sort of detailed policy, but is rather to 
prepare the stage as it were - to introduce actors and the sets, to 
pull up the curtain and then to leave it to the Committee to take on 
the direction of the discussion. 

You will understand that it has not been easy to decide what to say - 
nor indeed how one should say it I The subject is one of very great 
complexity and at present is charged with emotion and prejudice and 
besides this, during the recent days when I have been doing the necessary 
preparatory reading and thought, the whole immediate situation has been 
obscure to a world waiting anxiously for news of Count Bernadotte's 
proposals and of their reception alike by Jew and Arab. While the 
fundamental problem is firmly established on certain inescapable facts 
of physical and psychological kinds, the immediate position is completely 
unstable and fluid , 

It has seemed best to me not to attempt to lead us again over old 
ground of ancient or recent history, probably familiar to you all, nor 
to take up in detail any particular aspect of the problem nor any 
special set of circumstances or events In the discussion this may be 
necessary, but while it can be avoided I shall do so 5 What I shall try 
to do is firstly very briefly to show you what I conceive to be the 
fundamental problem, secondly to remind you of some of the varied and 
sometimes incompatible sides of the problem - or what we consider as 
secondary or derivative problems, and finally to make a few observations 
about what ways may lie ahead 9 

I must thus necessarily be brief and even superficial- I hope that this 
can be made good during our subsequent discussion - a discussion which 
I hope may lead us forward and not be devoted to a critical consideration 
only of the past, 

The Problem 

In essence - and this you. will later see is very different from the 
surface appearances - I think that it is - or should be - the problem 
of the relations - the daily human, social relations » between the 
Jews and Arabs of the Middle East, That sounds speciously simple - 
even naive -.But that is, in my view, because of the way that this 
essential question has been overlaid, distorted, and exploited by 
other problems and other powers. What makes the problem today so 
difficult, so fraught with danger not only to individual lives in 
Palestine but to the future peace even of the whole world is precisely 
this fact that extraneous circumstances have condensed this problem - 
compressed it like an explosive gas - into the tiny geographical area 
of Palestine - Only as I worked through various books and documents 



X-JX 1965 

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Paris, 12 de'cembre l$h8 

.LB MOUVEMENT GAgR3TDAVIS 

P*loK^ acteur d. son metier, 

de l'Allemagneo ToSch? par la D ? A JFSZ Q \ "^P* missions au-dessul 
avion s'ecrase en Suede? Je m'Scto™ Pt- f ff :de P^enemunde. Mon 
, Etats-Unis ou Je deviens inXuc^eu? fjf ^ S ^f 008 ^ puis les 

io me rendis compte que nous retournions°a lt2?,? P J es ma ^bHisatW 
par.exemple, jamais cesse' de fabric? L« I £ at d f ^ erre « 0n n'avaii 
sentais mSme pas en secu?itl dans ?e £?i« ^° m S es atom iqueSo Jw ne me 
Quelqu'un dovait Clever la voix jf n^^^VjF du *onde.... 
mais quelqu'un devait le ?aI?^°Aussi fe l?ai ^S^T?^ 55" «■*«*«* 
"je n'entends rien a la politique," ° Xl a dlt aussis 

&;"2ln; U d2 d |2i2: t'l^ltuliiae???^^ 13 SS rend a 1'ambassade 
report americain et affiSmf nS Ct ? n 5 U P ei, sonnel,~rend son 
C aStre naWonaStl* cfr 11 eTt bien^fJf Pf™* 5 '"- veut aoqurfrir 
^eserverait de la guerrel Et if slTeoltltTlt^T^l ^ ™ lo 

'Sel^leler^tXe^ ^^tembre, il eherche 

du monde II n'en es? d'aut?e que Vom if^T accueillir un citoyen 
l f ONU et, en attendant sJdJcision -^J^T donc dem ander asile a 
Palais de Chaillot II 2?*?? if,,? h\ ln ? tallQ sur les marches du 
l'appelait "!e Fol de CnSllot" Cafeoih ^ ,?" j ourna ^ on 
Mais dans son mauvais francai? 11 «™?? Ji piece de Girauaoux) . 
le voir, qu'il voulalt StrT "itoven d? mS5«u aUX curi ?^?^ venaient 
monde nous preserverait de la p,,2£S d « monde-', que seule l ? unite du 
peuple de Paris 1'entoura Pt il ! ^- a + ° analS ' Et b ient3t, le petit 
fit un lit de bois? les SnI lu? 2? U ? menuisier du quartier lui 

bananes et des pSes ou^n veJrHe vin^rp? P f *' J 9S n autres des 

mmi T/™d°%^ la 

Qu'adviendrait-il de lui ? au^^™ Part >P our le "citoyen du Sonde" 

expire - Le minis??e d^l^SrfeSr^rtui^.n? ' ^ en France se * ai ^ 
pour 3 mois ~ Ce n'est n a J Jpi! ™ ^ U1 P r °l° n S e a spontanement 

faire un statut^Sr^ci?^ iV^e^' ^^ DaVis > iX faut 

Mais on commence a le prendre au sp'ripiiv lo oo ™-i- v 

20 ecrivains fran ? ais connus se dlcKS i^ff-^T 2 ^^'^ grou P e de 



» VA/cj w"? 






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Paris „ I2oDezember I9*f8 



Nicht als Vizepraesidentin der Liga erzaehle ich Ihnen diese wahre Ge~ 
schichte 5 sondern rein persoenlich und zu Ihrer Information, Ich will 
jede Bewertung vermeiden und Sie nur bitten, mir Ihre Reaktion mitzutei- 
len und Ihre Schluesse daraus zu Ziehen fuer die Liga 

DIE GARRY DAVIS BEWEGUNCU 

Ein junger amerikanischer Schauspieler ,, Sohn eines- Dirigenten, Flieger- 
offizier waehrend des letzten Krieges^ "Siebenmal ueber Deutschland, ver- 
wundet von Flak liaber Pienemuende Mein Flugzeug stuerst ueber Schweden 
ab Ich fliehe und finde mein Bataillon wierViro Danach zurueck nach den 
Vereinigten Staaten, wo ich Truppen ausbildec , . „ Ein Jahr nach meiner 
Demobilisation wird mir bewusst ? dass wir in den Kriegszustand zurueck- 
kehren Man hat ? z c B 0? nie aufgehoert. Atombomben zu fabrizieren* Ich 
fuehlte mich selbst in dem groessten Land der Welt nicht sicher o ..* 
Jemand sollte seine Stimme erheben> Ich war vielleiclrtrnicht kompetent es 
zu tun-, aber irgend jemand sollte es tun So tat ich esS" Ausserdem sagte 
ers ,! Ich verstehe nichts von Politiko i! 

Tatsaechlich begab sich Garry Davis Anfang Septem ber 19^8 auf die ameri- 
kanische Botschaft in Paris und «= zur Bestuerzung des Personals - gab er 
seinen amerikanischen Pass dort zurueck, indem er erklaerteiy dass er das 
ht tue, urn eine andere Staacsangehoerigkeit zu erwerben, denn das 
^.aetze ihn auch nicht v or dem Krieg Er tue eSj weil er Weltbuerger 
sein wolle, 

Da seine franzoesiecho Aufenthaltserlaubnis am 20 o September ablief ? 
sucht er nach einem internationalen Gebiet,, das einen Weltbuerger auf- 
nehmen koenne.> Es gibt nur eins, das der UN0 o Er bittet also urn Asyl 
bei den UNO und 9 waehrend er auf ihre Antsort wartet, installiert er 
sich auf den Treppen des Palais Chailloto Er ist ganz alleiha In den Zei~ 
tungen nennt man ihn den "Narren von Chaillotn" nach einem Theaters tueck 
von '.Giraudouxa In seinem schlechten Franzoesisch erklaert er der neugie- 
rigen Menge, die sich versammeit, urn ihn zu sehen^ dass er "Weltbuerger" 
sein will, dass einzig und allein Einigkeit in der Welt uns vor einem 
neuen Krieg fuer immer hewahrto Sehr bald schliessen die Pariser ihn 
ins Herz und unterstuetzen ihn: ein Schreiner macht ihm ein Bett aus 
Holz, einige bringen ihm Brot, andere Bananen, Aepfel Oder ein Glas Wein 
Das dauert vom 12^17 -September, dem Tag,, an dem Garry Davis von der PoIi~ 
zei aus dem Gebiet der UNO gewiesen wirdo Es ist dort keinerlei Platz fuer 
den "Weltbuerger o" Was wird geschehenj. wenn seine franzoesische Aufenthalts- 
bewilligung erlischt?- Der Innenminis-cer verlaengert sie spontan um drei 
Monate Q Aber das ist nicht das ? was er will, sagt Davis, man muss ein 
Statut fuer Weltbuerger s chaff en 

Man faengt an'., ihn ernst zu nehmeiio Am 22»0ki;ober erklaeren sich 20 be-- 
kannte franzoesische Schrifts teller bereit ; ihn zu unterstuetzen und bil" 
den so den Anfag einer neuen Bewegung, die 'sich mit unglaublicher Ge~ 
schwindigkeit verbreitet, Dieser sogenannte "Solidaritaetsrat" erklaert 
ne Einsteliung folgendermassens "Jedes Mitglied erklaert sich identisch 
Davis' Ideen und will die Aufmerksamkeit der internationalen 
oeffentlichen' Meinung auf die Bedeutung seiner Handlungen lehken c Jedes 
Mitglied will sich aktiv an der Loesung der Schwierigkeiten beteiligen, 
die seine Handlungen fuer .ihn nach sich Ziehen moegen "